Barakah(Umm Ayman)

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Barakah(Umm Ayman)

We do not know precisely how the young Abyssinian girl ended up for sale in Makkah. We do not know her ‘roots’, who her mother was, or her father or her ancestors. There were many like her, boys and girls, Arabs and non-Arabs, who were captured and brought to the slave market of the city to be sold.

A few in that inhuman environment were rather more fortunate. They were taken into the homes of more gentle and caring people.
Barakah, the young Abyssinian girl, was one of the more fortunate ones. She was saved by the generous and kind Abdullah, the son of Abd al-Muttalib. ‘She became the only servant in his household and when he was married, to the lady Aminah, she looked after her affairs as well.

Two weeks after the couple were married, according to Barakah, Abdullah’s father came to their house and instructed his son to go with a trading caravan that was leaving for Syria. Aminah was deeply distressed and cried:

“How strange! How strange! How can my husband go on a trading journey to Syria while I am yet a bride and the traces of henna are still on my hands.”

Abdullah’s departure was heartbreaking. In her anguish, Aminah fainted. Soon after he left, Barakah said: “When I saw Aminah unconscious, I shouted in distress and pain: ‘O my lady!’ Aminah opened her eyes and looked at me with tears streaming down her face. Suppressing a groan she said: “Take me to bed, Barakah.”

“Aminah stayed bedridden for a long time. She spoke to no one. Neither did she look at anyone who visited her except Abd al-Muttalib, that noble and gentle old man. “Two months after the departure of Abdullah, Aminah called me at dawn one morning and, her face beaming with joy, she said to me:

“O Barakah! I have seen a strange dream.” “Something good, my lady,” I said.

“I saw lights coming from my abdomen lighting up the

mountains, the hills and the valleys around Makkah.” “Do you feel pregnant, my lady?”

“Yes, Barakah,” she replied. “But I do not feel any discomfort as other women feel.” “You shall give birth to a blessed child who will bring goodness,” I said.

 So long as Abdullah was away, Aminah remained sad and melancholic. Barakah stayed at her side trying to comfort her and make her cheerful by talking to her and relating stories. Aminah however became even more distressed when Abd al-Muttalib came and told her she had to leave her home and go to the mountains as other Makkans had done because of an impending attack on the city by the ruler of

Yemen, someone called Abrahah. Aminah told him that she was too grief-striken and weak to leave for the mountains but insisted that Abrahah could never enter Makkah and destroy the Kabah because it was protected by the Lord. 
Abd al-Muttalib became very agitated but there was no sign of fear on Aminah’s face. Her confidence that the Kabah would not be harmed was well-founded. Abrahah’s army with an elephant in the vanguard was destroyed before it could enter Makkah.

Day and night, Barakah stayed beside Aminah. She said: “I slept at the foot of her bed and heard her groans at night as she called for her absent husband. Her moans would awaken me and I would try to comfort her and give her courage.”

The first part of the caravan from Syria returned and was joyously welcomed by the trading families of Makkah. Barakah went secretly to the house of Abd al-Muttalib to find out about Abdullah but had no news of him. She went back to Aminah but did not tell her what she had seen or heard in order not to distress her. The entire caravan eventually returned but not with Abdullah.

Later, Barakah was at Abd al-Muttalib’s house when news came from Yathrib that Abdullah had died. She said: “I screamed when I heard the news. I don’t know what I did after that except that I ran to Aminah’s house shouting, lamenting for the absent one who would never return, lamenting for the beloved one for whom we waited so long, lamenting for the most beautiful youth of Makkah, for Abdullah, the pride of the Quraysh.

“When Aminah heard the painful news, she fainted and I stayed by her bedside while she was in a state between life and death. There was no one else but me in Aminah’s house. I nursed her and looked after her during the day and through the long nights until she gave birth to her child, “Muhammad”, on a night in which the heavens were resplendent with the light of God.”

When Muhammad was born, Barakah was the first to hold him in her arms. His grandfather came and took him to the Kabah and with all Makkah, celebrated his birth. Barakah stayed with Aminah while Muhammad was sent to the badiyah with the lady Halimah who looked after him in the bracing atmosphere of the open desert. At the end of five years, he was brought back to Makkah and Aminah received him with tenderness and love and Barakah welcomed him “with joy, longing and admiration”.

When Muhammad was six years old, his mother decided to visit the grave of her husband, Abdullah, in Yathrib. Both Barakah and Abd al-Muttalib tried to dissuade her. Aminah however was determined. So one morning they set off- Aminah, Muhammad and Barakah huddled together in a small hawdaj mounted on a large camel, part of a huge caravan that was going to Syria. In order to shield the tender child from any pain and worry, 
Aminah did not tell Muhammad that she was going to visit the grave of his father.

The caravan went at a brisk pace. Barakah tried to console Aminah for her son’s sake and much of the time the boy Muhammad slept with his arms around Barakah’s neck.

The caravan took ten days to reach Yathrib. The boy Muhammad was left with his maternal uncles of the Banu Najjar while Aminah went to visit the grave of Abdullah. Each day for a few weeks she stayed at the grave. She was consumed by grief.

On the way back to Makkah, Aminah became seriously ill with fever. Halfway between Yathrib and Makkah, at a place called al-Abwa, they stopped. Aminah’s health deteriorated rapidly. One pitch dark night, she was running a high temperature. The fever had got to her head and she called out to Barakah in a choking voice.
Barakah related: “She whispered in my ear: ‘O Barakah, I shall depart from this world shortly. I commend my son Muhammad to your care. He lost his father while he was in my abdomen. Here he is now, losing his mother under his very eyes. Be a mother to him, Barakah. And don’t ever leave him.’

“My heart was shattered and I began to sob and wail. The child was distressed by my wailing and began to weep. He threw himself into his mother’s arms and held tightly onto her neck. She gave one last moan and then was forever silent.”

Barakah wept. She wept bitterly. With her own hands she dug a grave in the sand and buried Aminah, moistening the grave with whatever tears were left in her heart. Barakah returned with the orphan child to Makkah and placed him in the care of his grandfather. She stayed at his house to look after him. When Abd al-Muttalib died two years later, she went with the child to the house of his uncle Abu Talib and continued to look after his needs until he was grown up and married the lady Khadijah.

Barakah then stayed with Muhammad and Khadijah in a house belonging to Khadijah. “I never left him and he never left me,” she said. One day Muhammad(S.A.W) called out to her and said: “Ya Ummah!” (He always called her “Mother”.) “Now I am a married man, and you are still unmarried. What do you think if someone should come now and ask to marry you?” Barakah looked at Muhammad and said: “I shall never leave you. Does a mother abandon her son?” Muhammad smiled and kissed her head. He looked at his wife Khadijah and said to her: “This is Barakah. This is my mother after my own mother. She is the rest of my family.”

Barakah looked at the lady Khadijah who said to her: “Barakah, you have sacrificed your youth for the sake of Muhammad. Now he wants to pay back some of his obligations to you. For my sake and his, agree to be married before old age overtakes you.”

“Whom shall I marry, my lady?” asked Barakah. “There is here now Ubayd ibn Zayd from the Khazraj tribe of Yathrib. He has come to us seeking your hand in marriage. For my sake, don’t refuse.”

Barakah agreed. She married Ubayd ibn Zayd and went with him to Yathrib. There she gave birth to a son whom she called Ayman and from that time onwards people called her “Umm Ayman” the mother of Ayman.

Her marriage however did not last very long. Her husband died and she returned once more to Makkah to live with her “son” Muhammad in the house of the lady Khadijah. Living in the same household at the time were Ali ibn Abi Talib, Hind (Khadijah’s daughter by her first husband), and Zayd ibn Harithah.

Zayd was an Arab from the tribe of Kalb who was captured as a boy and brought to Makkah to be sold in the slave market. He was bought by Khadijah’s nephew and put in her service. In Khadijah’s household, Zayd became attached to Muhammad and devoted himself to his service. Their relationship was like that of a son to a father. Indeed when Zayd’s father came to Makkah in search of him, Zayd was given the choice by Muhammad of either going with his father or staying with him. Zayd’s reply to his father was:

“I shall never leave this man. He has treated me nobly, as a father would treat his son. Not a single day have I felt that I am a slave. He has looked after me well. He is kind and loving towards me and strives for my enjoyment and happiness. He is the most noble of men and the greatest person in creation. How can I leave him and go with you?…I shall never leave him.”
Later, in public Muhammad proclaimed the freedom of Zayd. However, Zayd continued to live with him as part of his household and devoted himself to his service.
When Muhammad was blessed with prophethood, Barakah and Zayd were among the first to believe in the message he proclaimed. They bore with the early Muslims the persecution which the Quraysh meted out to them.

Barakah and Zayd performed invaluable services to the mission of the Prophet. They acted as part of an intelligence service exposing themselves to the persecution and punishment of the Quraysh and risking their lives to gain information on the plans and conspiracies of the mushrikin.

One night the mushrikun blocked off the roads leading to the House of al-Arqam where the Prophet gathered his companions regularly to instruct them in the teachings of Islam. Barakah had some urgent information from Khadijah which had to be conveyed to the Prophet. She risked her life trying to reach the House of al-Arqam. When she arrived and conveyed the message to the Prophet, he smiled and said to her:

“You are blessed, Umm Ayman. Surely you have a place in Paradise.” When Umm Ayman left, the Prophet looked at his companions and asked: “Should one of you desire to marry a woman from the people of Paradise, let him marry Umm Ayman.”

Ali the companions remained silent and did not utter a word. Umm Ayman was neither beautiful nor attractive. She was by now about fifty years old and looked rather frail. Zayd ibn al-Harithah however came forward and said:

“Messenger of Allah, I shall marry Umm Ayman. By Allah, she is better than women who have grace and beauty.”

Zayd and Umm Ayman were married and were blessed with a son whom they named Usamah. The Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, loved Usamah as his own son. Often he played with him, kissed him and fed him with his own hands. The Muslims would say: “He is the beloved son of the beloved.” From an early age Usamah distinguished himself in the service of lslam, and was later given weighty responsibilities by the Prophet.

When the Prophet migrated to Yathrib, henceforth to be known as al-Madinah, he left Umm Ayman behind in Makkah to look after certain special affairs in his household.
 Eventually she migrated to Madinah on her own. She made the long and difficult journey through the desert and mountainous terrain on foot. The heat was killing and sandstorms obscured the way but she persisted, borne along by her deep love and attachment for Muhammad, may God bless him and grant him peace. When she reached Madinah, her feet were sore and swollen and her face was covered with sand and dust.

You “Ya Umm Ayman! Ya Ummi! (O Umm Ayman! O my mother!) Indeed for you is a place in Paradise!” exclaimed the Prophet when he saw her. He wiped her face and eyes, massaged her feet and rubbed her shoulders with his kind and gentle hands.

At Madinah, Umm Ayman played her full part in the affairs of the Muslims. 
At Uhud she distributed water to the thirsty and tended the wounded. She accompanied the Prophet on some expeditions, to Khaybar and Hunayn for example.

Her son Ayman, a devoted companion of the Prophet was martyred at Hunayn in the eighth year after the Hijrah. Barakah’s husband, Zayd, was killed at the Battle of Mutah in Syria after a lifetime of distinguished service to the Prophet and Islam. Barakah at this time was about seventy years old and spent much of her time at home. 
The Prophet, accompanied by Abu Bakr and Umar often visited her and asked: “Ya Ummi! Are you well?” and she would reply: “I am well, O Messenger of Allah so long as Islam is.”

After the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, had died, Barakah would often be found with tears in her eyes. She was once asked, “Why are you crying?” and she replied: “By Allah, I knew that the Messenger of Allah would die but I cry now because the revelation from on high has come to an end for us.”

Barakah was unique in that she was the only one who was so close to the Prophet throughout his life from birth till death. Her life was one of selfless service in the Prophet’s household. She remained deeply devoted to the person of the noble, gentle and caring Prophet. Above all, her devotion to the religion of Islam was strong and unshakable. She died during the caliphate of Uthman. Her roots were unknown but her place in Paradise was assured.

Funeral Gathering on the 3rd day

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Funeral Gathering on the 3rd day

Today’s deen reminder is on a very important topic that is prevalent in our times. Kindly read on:
*Sadakar Uku and gathering after loss of a loved one.*
Ruling Concerning Post-Burial Gathering
Shaykh ibn Baaz رحمه الله was asked:
What is the ruling concerning what is known as al-ma`tim, in which people gather for three days after the burial in order to recite the Quran?
He  Responded: 
The gathering in the house of the deceased to eat, drink and recite the Qur’aan is an innovation. Similarly, their getting together to pray for the person and make supplications for him are also innovations. There is no source for it. All that should be done is that, people come to pay condolences, pray for the person, ask for mercy for them, console their grieving and encourage them to be patient. To gather for what they call al- ma’tim, to make particular supplications, particular prayers or reading of the Quran has no basis whatsoever. If that were a good act, our pious predecessors would have done it. 
The Messenger of Allaah صلي الله عليه و سلم did not do it. When Jaafar ibn Abee Taalib, Abdullaah ibn Rawaaha and Zaid ibn Haaritha were killed at the Battle of Mu’tah and the Prophet صلي الله عليه و سلم received the news through revelation, the Prophet announced that to the Companions and told them their news. He supplicated for them and asked Allaah to be pleased with them. He did no make a gathering. He did not prepare a meal or have a ma’tim. All of that he did not do even though the three who died were from the most virtuous of the Companions. 

When Abu Bakr died, also no one made a ma’tim, even though he was the best of the Companions. When Umar was killed, no one made a ma’tim. The people did not gather to pray or read the Qur’aan for him. Uthman and Ali were killed and the people did not gather after a specific time to pray for them, ask mercy for them or prepare food for them. It is, however, recommended for the relatives or neighbors of the deceased to prepare food for the deceased’s family and to send that food to them. This is similar to what the Prophet صلي الله عليه و سلم did when the news of Jaafar’s death came to him. He said to his family,
“Prepare food for the family of Jafar as something has occurred to them that is preoccupying them.”‘
The family of the deceased are preoccupied with their loss. To prepare food for them and send it to them is what is legal sanctioned. However, to add to their affliction and to put more responsibilities on their shoulders by making them prepare food for the people goes completely against the sunnah. In fact, it is an innovation. 
Jareer ibn Abdullaah al-Bajali said, “We used to consider gathering with the family of the deceased and preparing food after the burial as a kind of lamentation.” And lamentation is forbidden. This is to raise one’s voice, while the deceased is punished in the grave due to the wailing over him. One must avoid such practices. However, there is no harm in crying with tears.

Eid Visit

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Eid is a time of happiness and joy. A time in which we spend with our loved ones to share the joyful period together. Eid should be a memorable occasion for everyone.
Alhamdulillah. We were opportuned to visit the sick this eid as spending eid in the hospital would mean a gloomy eid for them especially the kids. We visited the paediatric, medical and surgical wards in University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital on the 2nd day of eid and took to them a package containing rice, chicken and juice. 


The patients met us with surprised, happy, and grateful faces. We wished them a happy and memorable sallah as well as a fast recovery and said goodbye.


May Allah (swt) accept and give us all the ability to do more, ameen thumma ameen.


“The feeling i get during a sisters circle or hospital visit is beyond description”- khadija (Umm saabir)

🌺 Poetic Saturday 🌺

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🌺 Poetic Saturday 🌺

Bismillah
“Live every day likes it’s your last, live with no regrets” 

“Live every day smiling, live it up to the best”

Society today uses these lines to motivate us into relationships with the opposite sex

To get over our ex, move on to the next

Take chances and risks, gamble at casinos and place huge bets

Party and drink, smoke marijuana and cigarettes

The motto is YOLO, and enjoy every single thing you know possible until we are dead

And it’s sad to say that Muslims, including myself tend to forget

That this life is temporary, this dunya is just a test

We fall into these worldly desires and still we expect

That Allah Subhanawata’ala will grant us happiness in this life and the next

But don’t get me wrong, I think it’s brilliant to live a life with no regrets

And to smile every day is a sunnah, which we should follow to the best, of our abilities

And Allah does not test us with anything which is out of our capabilities

And by no regrets, I mean a life we live Islamically so Insha’Allah to heaven we are sent

Where we sin less and even when we make mistakes, we immediately repent

Because tomorrow is not promised, and yesterday can never be changed

And the present is filled with peasants, so say Alhumdullilah for everything you have today

These worldly desires are just a way to lead us astray, so don’t play in Satan’s game

Read Qur’an, wake up for Fajr and the daily 5 prayers we should pray

And enjoy life, live it to the best in a halal way

Because all we have left are our good deeds deep down in the grave

So please my dear brothers and sisters, the last thing I will say

Ya Allah, please grant us the will to please you… and make the best of each day!

Poem by Syed Ali

Al-Ghaffar,   Al-Ghaffur

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Al-Ghaffar,   Al-Ghaffur

Al-Ghaffar- The Repeatedly forgiving

 Al-Ghaffur- The one who has the power to forgive

Linguistically, both ghafoor and ghaffaar refer to the concept of maghfirah(forgiveness, conceal).

 In over 300 verses of the Qur’an, Allah attributes “maghfira” to Himself 
And verily, I am indeed Forgiving to him who repents, believes (in My Oneness, and associates none in worship with Me) and does righteous good deeds, and then remains constant in doing them, (till his death).(Surat Taha20:82)
“The Lord of the heavens and the earth and all that is between them, the All-Mighty, the Oft-Forgiving.”(Surat Sad)
He has created the heavens and the earth with truth. He makes the night to go in the day and makes the day to go in the night. And He has subjected the sun and the moon. Each running (on a fixed course) for an appointed term. Verily, He is the All-Mighty, the Oft-Forgiving.(Surat Az-Zumar39:5)

Al-Ghaffaar refers to the fact that Allah forgives repeatedly, emphacizing frequency(the quantity) whereas the name Al-Ghafoor points to the extent of His forgiveness, regardless of the size, type, form of sins (the quality). Allah’s name Al-Ghafoor does not just mean that He forgives us; He also protects and shields us from the consequences of our own actions. He does maghfirah— He covers our sins while being fully aware of what they are. His perfect forgiveness is truly a sign of His ultimate mercy for us!

The One who accepts repentance and veils or forgives our faults and sins, time and time again. The One who sets us free from the guilt and shame of our own sins and faults, such that we may discover inner harmony and peace.
One of the most common pairs is Allah’s name Al-Ghafoor combined with Ar-Raheem, which is repeated 72 times in the Quran, demonstrating that He covers these sins because He is so merciful to us.

An example of this beautiful combination is in one of the most hope-giving, heart-comforting ayaat in the Quran. Al-Ghafoor Himself says: Say, O My servants who have transgressed against themselves [by sinning], do not despair of the mercy of Allah. Indeed, Allah forgives all sins. Indeed, it is He who is the Forgiving, the Merciful. [Quran 39:53] Instead of saying: O, you sinners! look at how gently Al-Ghafoor addresses us by saying yaa eebaadee, O my servants who have transgressed against themselves. Alhamdulillah; we have a Lord who is intensely forgiving and merciful to us.
These names of Allah are truely beautiful. As humans we are never free of sins and mistakes. 

A characteristic of a true believer is that he or she never despairs. We don’t despair in the help of Allah ‘azza wa jall and we don’t despair in His mercy and forgiveness. This means that whenever we commit a bad deed– and because we are humans, we will sin– we don’t let it get us down but rather fight back by turning to Al-Ghafoor, Al-Ghaffar no matter the gravity of the sin and no matter how many times, and following up our sin with a good deed. Allah loves those who turn to Him constantly in forgiveness.

Wherever we are, may Allah make us firm to never despair in his mercy. May Allah grant us forgiveness for all our sins known and unknown to us. And grant us Jannah out of His mercy. Ameen!

Celebration of Birthdays 

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Celebration of Birthdays 

Many Muslim parents and children have misunderstood the concept of birthday in Islaam and different people have had different opinions regarding this issue. 

To begin with, it’s imperative to ask ourselves the origin of this famous and common event called birthday. 
Historically, the Romans were among the first people to celebrate birthdays many years before the birth of Isa alaihi salaam (B.C). 
To them birthdays meant celebrating the start of things, called a dies natalis (birth day). Temples, cities, and people were often remembered for their days of birth. All this in a society where a baby living past a year old was quite an accomplishment. 
As Kathryn Argetsinger has written
The birthday in the Roman mindset was much closer to a cultic religious celebration predominantly because each person had a genius (a tutelary spirit) that they sacrificed to on their day of birth. This deity (spirit) protected an individual for the year, and thus there was a re-up of that protection annually through the performance of a sacrifice. 
Birthday parties were a key mix of religion and friendship, where sacrifices were made, incense was burned, ritual cakes were made and eaten, and white robes were worn.
This is what history confirms to us about origin of birthday parties. 
It is now more than clear where this event came from and for this reason there is very close similarity between the Romans’ birthday parties and ours today:- 
– lighting candles

– exchanging gifts

– cutting cakes

– wearing special dresses. 
What many people do not realize while celebrating birthdays is that as per the Romans who are the teachers and inventors of birthday, it is done to please the spirit of a person for that particular year so as not to harm him or to be in good terms with him. 
Where is this and the teachings of Islaam in Aqeedah. 
In summary therefore, celebrating birthdays is a blind way of following people of distorted civilizations and belief and this is the main reason why there is no text that urges Muslims to celebrate the days they were born. 
One may argue that the Prophet (sall-Allahu alaihi wasallam) used to fast on Mondays because it was the day he was born. And the answer is this hadith is saheeh but does not support the argument made in the sense that the Prophet never said those words so that we also fast or celebrate the days WE were born, but to teach us that if we want to follow his Sunnah then we fast as he did – the day he was born. Furthermore, he never mentioned that it was a celebration to him, but it is understood that it was a way of him thanking Allah. 
In addition to the above, celebration of birthdays contain many other habits that are condemned in Islaam. For example: 
 – Playing music, singing and dancing. 

– Free mixing of boys and girls. 

– Wearing of shameful dresses among girls. 

– Honouring the Roman and Greek calendars in which the birthdays are found. 
May Allah give us hidaayah and thabaat fil Deen.

Abu Ayyub Al Ansari

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Abu Ayyub Al Ansari

Khalid ibn Zayd ibn Kulayb from the Banu Najjar was a great and close companion of the Prophet. He was known as Abu Ayyub (the father of Ayyub) and enjoyed a privilege which many of the Ansar in Madinah hoped they would have.

When the Prophet(S.A.W) reached Madinah after his hijrah from Makkah, he was greeted with great enthusiasm by the Ansar of Madinah. Their hearts went out to him and their eyes followed him with devotion and love. They wanted to give him the most generous reception anyone could be given.

The Prophet(S.A.W) first stopped at Quba on the outskirts of Madinah and stayed there for some days. The first thing he did was to build a mosque which is described in the Qur’an as the “mosque built on the foundation of piety (taqwa)”.

(Surah At-Tawbah 9: 108).

The Prophet(S.A.W) entered Madinah on his camel. The chieftains of the city stood along his path, each one wishing to have the honour of the Prophet alighting and staying at his house. One after the other stood in the camel’s way entreating, “Stay with us, O Rasulullah.”

“Leave the camel,” the Prophet(S.A.W) would say. “It is under command.”

The camel continued walking, closely followed by the eyes and hearts of the people of Yathrib. When it went past a house, its owner would feel sad and dejected and hope would rise in the hearts of others still on the route.

The camel continued in this fashion with the people following it until it hesitated at an open space in front of the house of Abu Ayyub al-Ansari. But the Prophet(S.A.W) did not get down. After only a short while, the camel set off again, the Prophet(S.A.W) leaving its reins loose. Before long, however, it turned round, retraced its steps and stopped on the same spot as before. Abu Ayyub’s heart was filled with happiness. He went out to the Prophet(S.A.W) and greeted him with great enthusiasm. He took the Prophet’s(S.A.W) baggage in his arms and felt as if he was carrying the most precious treasure in the world.

Abu Ayyub’s house had two storeys. He emptied the upper floor of his and his family’s possessions so that the Prophet(S.A.W) could stay there. But the Prophet(S.A.W) preferred to stay on the lower floor.

Night came and the Prophet retired. Abu Ayyub went up to the upper floor. But when they had closed the door, Abu Ayyub turned to his wife and said:

“Woe to us! What have we done? The messenger of God(S.A.W) is below and we are higher than he! Can we walk on top of the messenger of God? Do we come between him and the Revelation? If so, we are doomed.”

The couple became very worried not knowing what to do. They only got some peace of mind when they moved to the side of the building which did not fall directly above the Prophet. They were careful also only to walk on the outer parts of the floor and avoid the middle.

In the morning, Abu Ayyub said to the Prophet:

“By God, we did not sleep a wink last night, neither myself nor Umm Ayyub.”

“Why not, Abu Ayyub?” asked the Prophet.

Abu Ayyub explained how terrible they felt being above while the Prophet was below them and how they might have interrupted the Revelation.

“Don’t worry, Abu Ayyub,” said the Prophet. “We prefer the lower floor because of the many people coming to visit us.”

“We submitted to the Prophet’s wishes,” Abu Ayyub related, “until one cold night a jar of ours broke and the water spilled on the upper floor. Umm Ayyub and I stared at the water. We only had one piece of velvet which we used as a blanket. We used it to mop up the water out of fear that it would seep through to the Prophet(S.A.W). In the morning I went to him and said, ‘I do not like to be above you,’ and told him what had happened. He accepted my wish and we changed floors.”

The Prophet(S.A.W) stayed in Abu Ayyub’s house for almost seven months until his mosque was completed on the open space where his camel had stopped. He moved to the rooms which were built around the mosque for himself and his family. He thus became a neighbour of Abu Ayyub. What a noble neighbour to have had!

Abu Ayyub continued to love the Prophet with all his heart and the Prophet also loved him dearly. There was no formality between them. The Prophet continued to regard Abu Ayyub’s house as his own. The following anecdote tells a great deal about the relationship between them.

Abu Bakr(R.A) once left his house in the burning heat of the midday sun and went to the mosque. Umar saw him and asked, “Abu Bakr, what has brought you out at this hour? Abu Bakr said he had left his house because he was terribly hungry and Umar(R.A) said that he had left his house for the same reason. The Prophet(S.A.W) came up to them and asked, “What has brought the two of you out at this hour?” They told him and he said, “By Him in Whose hands is my soul, only hunger has caused me to come out also. But come with me.”

They went to the house of Abu Ayyub al-Ansari. His wife opened the door and said, “Welcome to the Prophet and whoever is with him.”

“Where is Abu Ayyub?” asked the Prophet(S.A.W). Abu Ayyub, who was working in a nearby palm grove, heard the Prophet’s voice and came hurriedly.

“Welcome to the Prophet and whoever is with him,” he said and went on, “O Prophet of God, this is not the time that you usually come.” (Abu Ayyub used to keep some food for the Prophet every day. When the Prophet did not come for it by a certain time, Abu Ayyub would give it to his family.) “You are right,” the Prophet agreed.

Abu Ayyub went out and cut a cluster of dates in which there were ripe and half-ripe dates.
“I did not want you to cut this,” said the Prophet. “Could you not have brought only the ripe dates?”

“O Rasulullah, please eat from both the ripe dates (rutb) and the half ripe (busr). I shall slaughter an animal for you also.”

“If you are going to, then do not kill one that gives milk,” cautioned the Prophet.

Abu Ayyub killed a young goat, cooked half and grilled the other half. He also asked his wife to bake, because she baked better, he said.

When the food was ready, it was placed before the Prophet and his two companions. The Prophet took a piece of meat and placed it in a loaf and said, “Abu Ayyub, take this to Fatimah. She has not tasted the like of this for days.”

When they had eaten and were satisfied, the Prophet said reflectively:

“Bread and meat and busr and rutb!” Tears began to flow from his eyes as he continued:

“This is a bountiful blessing about which you will be asked on the Day of Judgment. If such comes your way, put your hands to it and say, ‘Bismillah’ (In the name of God) and when you have finished say, ‘Al hamdu lillah alladhee huwa ashba’na wa an’ama a layna (Praise be to God Who has given us enough and Who has bestowed his bounty on us). This is best.”

These are glimpses of Abu Ayyub’s life during peace time. He also had a distinguished military career. Much of his time was spent as a warrior until it was said of him, “He did not stay away from any battle the Muslims fought from the time of the Prophet to the time of Mu’awiyah unless he;: was engaged at the same time in another.”

The last campaign he took part in was the one prepared by Mu’awiyah and led by his son Yazid against Constantinople. Abu Ayyub at that time was a very old man, almost eighty years old. But that did not prevent him from joining the army and crossing the seas as a graze in the path of God. 
After only a short time engaged in the battle, Abu Ayyub fell ill and had to withdraw from fighting. Yazid came to him and asked:

“Do you need anything, Abu Ayyub?”

“Convey my salaams to the Muslim armies and say to them:

‘Abu Ayyub urges you to penetrate deeply into the territory of the enemy as far as you can go, that you should carry him with you and that you should bury him under your feet at the walls of Constantinople.”‘ Then he breathed his last.

The Muslim army fulfilled the desire of the companion of the Messenger of God. They pushed back the enemy’s forces in attack after attack until they reached the walls of Constantinople. There they buried him.

(The Muslims beseiged the city for four years but eventually had to withdraw after suffering heavy losses.)