Category Archives: Stories Of The Salaf

Story of the believer and the disbeliever

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Story of the believer and the disbeliever

وَاضْرِبْ لَهُمْ مَثَلًا رَجُلَيْنِ جَعَلْنَا لِأَحَدِهِمَا جَنَّتَيْنِ مِنْ أَعْنَابٍ وَحَفَفْنَاهُمَا بِنَخْلٍ وَجَعَلْنَا بَيْنَهُمَا زَرْعًا

And present to them an example of two men: We granted to one of them two gardens of grapevines, and We bordered them with palm trees and placed between them [fields of] crops.

-Sura Al-Kahf, Ayah 32

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Allah gives a parable of two men, one of whom Allah gave two gardens of grapes, surrounded with palm trees and cultivated with crops throughout. All of the trees and plants were abundantly fruitful, providing readily accessible, good quality produce.

One day, the owner of the two gardens was boasting and showing off to his friend. “I am greater than you in wealth and have a mightier entourage.” He said. “And he went into his garden having been unjust to himself.”

He said: “I do not think this will ever perish.” Thus he was allowing himself to be deceived because of the plants, fruits and trees that he saw, and the rivers flowing through the different parts of his gardens. He thought that it could never come to an end or cease or be destroyed. This was because of his lack of understanding and the weakness of his faith in Allah, and because he was enamored with this world and its adornments, and because he disbelieved in the Hereafter.

The rich man’s believing companion replied to him, warning and rebuking him for his disbelief in Allah and allowing himself to be deceived. And said to him “When you entered your garden and looked at it and liked it, why would’nt you praise Allah for the blessings He gave you and the wealth and children that He has given to you and not to others Why did you not say `That which Allah wills! There is no power but with Allah!”’

One of the Salaf said, “Whoever is delighted with something in his circumstances or his wealth or his children, let him say, “Ma Sha Allah la quwwata illa billah (`That which Allah wills! There is no power but with Allah!’)”

What this disbeliever was afraid of and what the believer had terrified him actually had happened. A storm struck his garden, a garden which he had erroneously thought would last forever, distracting him from thoughts of Allah, and he lost everything.

And he could only say: “Would that I had ascribed no partners to my Lord!”

The Story of the Believer and the Disbeliever, as given in Surah Al-Kahf (18:32-44), is the story about the mistake people repeatedly make of taking for granted Allah’s Generosity and the wealth He (SWT) bestows upon them. Such was the case of the disbeliever who, proud of his good fortune, ignored the believer’s reminders to thank Allah. The disbeliever only regretted his mistake when Allah’s Decree took effect, depriving the ungrateful man of all he had. But by then it was too late.

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Zayd Al-Khayr

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Zayd  Al-Khayr

People are made up of basic “metals” or qualities. The best of them in JahilIyyah are the best of them in Islam, according to a hadith of the Prophet. Here are two pictures of a noble companion one during his life in Jahiliyyah and the other after he became a Muslim. In Jahiliyyah, this Sahabi was known as Zayd al-Khayl. When he became a Muslim, the Prophet renamed him Zayd al-Khayr. The tribe of Aamir were afflicted one year by a severe drought which destroyed crops and vegetation and caused livestock to perish. So bad was it that one man left the tribe with his family and went to Hira. There he left his family with the words, “Wait for me here till I return to you.” He swore to himself not to return to them until he earned some money for them or died in the process.

The man took some provisions with him and walked all day in search of something for his family. At nightfall, he found himself in front of a tent. Nearby a horse was tethered and he said to himself: “This is the first booty.” He went to the horse, untied it and was about to mount it when a voice called out to him: “Leave it and take your life as booty.” He hastily abandoned the horse. For seven days he walked until he reached a place where there was a pasture for camels. Nearby was an enormous tent with a leather dome, signs of great riches and wealth. The man said to himself: “Doubtless this pasture has camels and doubtless this tent has occupants.” The sun was about to set. The man looked inside the tent and saw a very old man in the centre. He sat down behind the old man without the latter realizing his presence.

The sun soon set. A horseman, imposing and well built, approached. He rode his mount erect and tall. Two male servants accompanied him, one on his right and the other on his left. With him were almost a hundred she-camels and in front of them a huge male camel. Clearly he was a well-endowed man. To one of the servants he said, pointing to a fat camel: “Milk this and give the old man a drink.”-The shaykh drank one or two mouthfuls from the full vessel which was brought to him and left it. The wanderer went up to it stealthily and drank all the milk in it. The servant returned, took the vessel and said: “Master, he has drunk it all.” The horseman was happy and ordered another camel to be milked.

The old man drank only one mouthful and the wanderer drank hall ol what was left so as not to arouse the suspicion of the horseman. The horseman then ordered his second servant to kill a sheep. Some of it was grilled and the horseman fed the shaykh until he was satisfied. He and the two servants then ate. After this, they all slept soundly; their snoring filled the tent. The wanderer then went to the he-camel, untied and mounted it. He rode off and the she camels followed. He rode throughout the night. At daybreak he looked around in every direction but did not see anyone following him. He pushed on until the sun was high in the sky. He looked around and suddenly saw something like an eagle or a big bird in the distance coming towards him. It quickly gained on him and soon he saw that it was the horseman on his horse.

The wanderer dismounted and tied the he-camel. He took out an arrow and placed it in his bow and stood in front of the other camels. The horseman stopped at a distance and shouted: “Untie the camel.” The man refused saying how he had left behind him a hungry family in Hira and how he had sworn not to return unless he had money or died in the process. “You are dead if you do not untie the camel,” said the horseman. The wanderer again refused to do so. The horseman threatened him once more and said: “Hold out the reins of the camel. There are three knots in it. Tell me in which of them you want me to place my arrow.” The man pointed to the middle knot and the horseman lodged an arrow right in the centre as if he had neatly placed it there with his hand. He did the same with the second and third knots. At that, the man quietly returned his own arrow to his quiver and gave himself up. The horseman took away his sword and his bow and said to him: “Ride behind me.”

The man expected the worst fate to befall him now. He was at the complete mercy of the horseman who said: “Do you think I will cause you harm when you have shared with Muhalhil (the old man, his father) his drink and his food last night?” When the man heard the name Muhalhil, he was astonished and asked: “Are you Zayd al-Khayl?” “Yes,” said the horseman. “Be the best captor,” pleaded the man. “Don’t worry,” replied Zayd al-Khayl calmly. “If these camels were mine, I would give them to you. But they belong to one of my sisters. But stay some days with me. I am about to make a raid.” Three days later he raided the Banu Numayr and captured about a hundred camels, as booty. He gave them all to the man and sent some men with him as guards until he reached his family in Hira. The above is a story of Zayd al-Khayl as he was in Jahiliyyah recounted by the historian ashShaybani. The books of Siyar give another picture of Zayd al-Khayl as he was in Islam .

. . When Zayd alKhayl heard the news of the Prophet, peace be upon him, he made some of his own enquiries and then decided to go to Madinah to meet the Prophet. With him was a big delegation of his people among whom were Zurr ibn Sudoos, Malik ibn Jubayr, Aamir ibn Duwayn and others. When they reached Madinah, they went straight to the Prophet’s Mosque and tethered their mounts at its door. It happened that as they entered, the Prophet was on the mimbar addressing the Muslims. His speech aroused Zayd and his delegation and they were also astonished by the rapt attention of the Muslims and the effect of the Prophet’s words on them. The Prophet was saying: “I am better for you than alUzza (one of the main idols of the Arabs in Jahiliyyah) and everything else that you worship.

I am better for you than the black camel which you worship besides God.” The Prophet’s words had two different effects on Zayd al-Khayl and those with him. Some of them responded positively to the Truth and accepted it. Some turned away and rejected it. One of the latter was Zurr ibn Sudoos. When he saw the devotion of the believers to Muhammad, both envy and fear filled his heart and he said to those with him: “I see a man who shall certainly captivate all Arabs and bring them under his sway. I shall not let him control me ever.” He then headed towards Syria where it is said he shaved his head (as was the practice of some monks) and became a Christian.

The reaction of Zayd and others was different. When the Prophet had finished speaking, Zayd stood up, tall and impressive-looking in the midst of the Muslims and said in a loud and clear voice: “O Muhammad, I testify that there is no god but Allah and that you are the messenger of Allah.” The Prophet came up to him and asked, “Who are you?” “I am Zayd al-Khayl the son of Muhalhil.” “From now on you are Zayd al-Khayr instead, not Zayd al-Khayl,” said the Prophet. “Praise be to God Who has brought you from the hills and dales of your native land and softened your heart towards Islam.” Thereafter he was known as Zayd al-Khayr (Zayd the Good). The Prophet then took him to his house. With them were Umar ibn al-Khattab and some other Companions.

The Prophet gave him a cushion to sit on but he felt very uncomfortable to recline thus in the presence of the Prophet and he returned the cushion. The Prophet handed it back to him and he returned it to him. This happened three times. Eventually, when they were all seated, the Prophet said to Zayd al-Khayr: “O Zayd, no man has ever been described to me and when I see him he does not fit the description at all except you. You have two characteristics which are pleasing to God and His Prophet.” “What are they?” asked Zayd. “Perseverance and sagacity,” replied the Prophet. “Praise be to God,” said Zayd, “Who has given me what He and His Prophet like.” He then turned directly to the Prophet and said: “Give me, O rnessenger of God, three hundred horsemen and I promise you that I will secure Byzantine territory with them.”

The Prophet praised his fervour and said, “What manner of man are you!” During this visit, all those who stayed with Zayd became Muslims. They then desired to return to their homes in Najd and the Prophet bade them farewell. The great desire of Zayd al-Khayr to work and fight for the cause of Islam, however, was not to be realised. In Madinah al-Munawwarah at that time there was an epidemic of fever and Zayd al-Khayr succumbed to it and said to those with him: “Take me away from the land of Qays. I have the fever of small pox. By God, I shall not fight as a Muslim before I meet Allah, the Mighty the Great.” Zayd took the road to his people in Najd in spite of the fact that the fever became more and more intense and slowed him down. He hoped at least to get back to his people and that they would become Muslims, through God’s grace, at his hands. He struggled to overcome the fever but it got the better of him and he breathed his last on the way before reaching Najd. Between his acceptance of Islam and his death, however, there was no time for him to have fallen into sin.

From: “Companions of The Prophet”, Vol.1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.

Utbah Ibn Ghazwan

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Utbah Ibn Ghazwan

Umar ibn alKattab, the head of the rapidly expanding Muslim State went to bed early just after the Salat al-Isha. He wanted to have a rest and feel refreshed for his nightly tour of inspection of the capital city which he often did incognito. Before he could/all asleep however, the post from the outlying regions of the State arrived informing him that the Persian forces confronting the Muslims were proving especially difficult to subdue. They were able to send in reinforcements and supplies from many places to relieve their armies on the point of defeat. The letter urged Umar to send reinforcements and in particular it said: “The city of al-Ubullah must be considered one of the most important sources providing men and material to the Persian forces under attack.”

Umar decided then to despatch an army to take the city of al-Ubullah and cut off its line of supplies to the Persian armies. His main problem was that he had so few men left with him in the city. That was because young men, men of maturity and even old men had gone out on campaigns far and wide in the path of God, fisabilillah. In these circumstances he determined to follow the strategy which he knew and which was well-tried that is, to mobilize a small force and place it under the leadership of a strong and able commander. He considered, one after another the names of the individuals who were still with him, to see who was the most suitable commander. Finally, he exclaimed himself: “I have found him. Yes I have found him.” He then went back to bed:

The person he had in mind was a well-known mujahid who had fought at Badr, Uhud, al-Khandaq and other battles. He had also fought in the terrible battles of Yamamah and emerged unscathed. He was in fact one of the first to accept Islam. He went on the first hijrah to Abyssinia but had returned to stay with the Prophet in Makkah. He then went on hijrah to Madinah. This tall and imposing companion of the Prophet was known for his exceptional skill in the use of spears and arrows. When morning came, Umar called his attendants and said: “Call Utbah ibn Ghazwan for me,” Umar managed to put together an army of just over three hundred men and he appointed Utbah as their commander with the promise that he would send reinforcements to him as soon as possible. When the army was assembled in ranks ready to depart, Umar al-Faruq stood before them bidding them farewell and giving instructions to his commander, Utbah.

He said: “Utbah, I am sending you to the land of al-Ubullah. It is one of the major fortresses of the enemy and I pray that God helps you to take it. When you reach the city, invite its inhabitants to the worship of God. If they respond to you, accept them (as Muslims). If they refuse, then take from them the jizyah.. If they refuse to pay the jizyah then fight them… And fear God, O Utbah, in the discharge of your duties. Beware of letting yourself become too haughty or arrogant for this will corrupt your hereafter. Know that you were a companion of the Messenger of God, may God bless him and grant him peace. God honoured you through him after your being insignificant. He strengthened you through him after you were weak. You have become a commander with authority and a leader who must be obeyed. What a great blessing if this does not make you vain and deceive you and lead you to Jahannam. May God protect you and me from it.”

With this chastening advice and prayer, Utbah and his army set off. Several women were in the army including his wife and the wives and sisters of other men. Eventually they reached a place called Qasbaa not very far from al-Ubullah. It was called Qasbaa because of the abundance of reed-like stalks which grew there. At that point the army was absolutely famished. They had nothing to eat. When hunger gripped them, Utbah ordered some of his men to go and search the land for something to eat. One of the men told the story of their search of food: “While we were searching for something to eat, we entered a thicket and, lo and behold there were two large baskets. In one there were dates and in the other small white grains covered with a yellow husk. We dragged the baskets with the grain and said: “This is poison which the enemy has prepared for you. Don’t go near it all.”

We went for the dates and began eating from it. While we were busy eating the dates, a horse which had broken loose from its tether went up to the basket of grain and began eating from it. By God, we seriously thought of slaughtering it before it should die (from the alleged poison) and benefit from its meat. However, its owner came up to us and said: “Leave it. I shall look after it for the night and if I feel that it is going to die, I will slaughter it.” In the morning we found the horse quite healthy with no sign of ill effects. My sister then said: ‘Yaa akhi, I have heard my father saying: Poison does not harm (food) if it is placed on fire and cooked well.’ We then took some of the grain, placed it in a pot and put it on a fire. After a short while my sister called out: ‘Come and see how it has become red and the husks have begun to separate leaving white grains.’

We placed the white grains in a large bowl and Utbah said to us: ‘Mention the name of Allah on it and eat it.’ We ate and found it exceedingly delicious and good. We learnt after that the grain was called rice.” The army of Utbah then went on to the fortified city of al-Ubullah on the banks of the River Euphrates. The Persians used al-Ubullah as a massive arms depot. There were several fortresses in the city from which towers sprang. These were used as observation posts to detect any hostile movements outside the city. The city appeared to be impregnable. What chance had Utbah of taking it with such a small force armed with only swords and spears? A direct assault was obviously futile and so Utbah had to resort to some stratagem. Utbah had flags prepared which he had hung on spears. These he gave to the women and ordered them to march behind the army. His instructions to them then were:

“When we get near to the city, raise the dust behind us so that the entire atmosphere is filled with it.” As they neared al-Ubullah, a Persian force came out to confront them, they saw the Muslims boldly advancing, the flags fluttering behind them and the dust which was being churned up and which filled the air around. They thought that the Muslims in front of the flags were merely the vanguard of the advancing army, a strong and numerous army. They felt they would be no match for such a foe. They lost heart and prepared to evacuate the city. Picking up whatever valuables they could, they rushed to boats anchored on the river and abandoned their well fortified city.

Utbah entered al-Ubullah without losing any of his men. From this base he managed to bring surrounding towns and villages under Muslim control. When news spread of Utbah’s successes, and of the richness of the land he had occupied, many people flocked to the region in search of wealth and easy living. Uqbah noted that many Muslims now inclined towards a soft life and followed the ways and customs of the region and that this weakened their determination to continue struggling. He wrote to Umar ibn al-Khattab asking for permission to build the garrison town of Basrah. He described the locations he had chosen for the city and Umar gave his assent. Basrah lay between the desert and the ports of the Gulf and from this base expeditions were launched further east.

The positioning of the town was for maximum military effectiveness (not merely to support an army of occupation). Utbah himself planned the city and built its first great masjid which was a simple enclosure, roofed over at one end and suitable for mass assemblies. From the mosque, Utbah and his men went out on military campaigns. These men eventually settled on the land and built houses. Utbah himself however did not build a house for himself but continued to live in a tent of cloth. He had seen how preoccupation with worldly possessions had caused many people to forget themselves and their real purpose in life. He had seen how men who not long ago knew no food better than rice boiled in their husks, getting accustomed to sophisticated Persian patisserie like fasludhanj and lawzinaj made with refined flour, butter, honey and nuts of various kinds to the point where they hankered after these things.

Utbah was afraid that his din would be affected by his dunya and he was concerned about his hereafter. He called men to the masjid of Basrah and addressed them thus: “O people! The dunya will come to an end and you will be carried from it to an abode which will not wane or disappear. Go to it with the best of your deeds. I look back and see myself among the early Muslims with the Messenger of Allah may God bless him and grant him peace. We had no food then apart from the leaves of trees and our lips would fester. One day I found a burdah. I tore it in two and shared it with Sad ibn Abi Waqqas. I made an aazar with one half and he did the same with the other half. Here we are today.

There is not one of us but he is an amir of one of the garrison towns. I seek Allah’s protection lest I become great in my own estimation and little in the sight of Allah..” With these words Utbah appointed someone else to stand in his place, and bade farewell to the people of Basrah. It was the season of pilgrimage and he left to perform the Hajj. He then travelled to Madinah and there he asked Umar to relieve him of the responsibility of governing the city. Umar refused. He could not easily dispense with a governor of the quality of Utbah and said to him: “You place your trusts and your responsibilities on my neck and then you abandon me to myself. No, by God, I shall never relieve you.”

So Umar prevailed upon him and commanded him to return to Basrah, Utbah knew that he had to obey the Amir al-Muminin but he did so with a heavy heart. He mounted his camel and on his way he prayed: “O Lord, do not send me back to Basrah. O Lord, do not send me back to Basrah.” He had not gone far from Madinah when his camel stumbled. Utbah fell and the injuries he sustained proved to be fatal.

From: Alim® Online

Uqbah Ibn Aamir

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Uqbah Ibn Aamir

After a long and exhausting journey, the Prophet, peace be on him, is at last on the outskirts of Yathrib. The good people of the city go out to meet him. Many crowd the narrow streets. Some stand on roof- tops chanting La ilaha ilia Allah and Allahu Akbar in sheer joy at meeting the Prophet of Mercy and his loyal companion, Abu Bakr as-Siddiq. The small girls of the city come out gaily beating their daffs and singing the words of welcome:

Tala ‘a-l badru alaynaa

Min Thaniyaati-l Wadaa’ Wajaba-sh shukru alaynaa Maa da’aa lillaahi daa’ Ayyuha-l mab ‘uthu finaa Ji’ta bi-l amri-l mutaa’ Ji’ta sharrafta-l Madinah Marhaban yaa khayra-d daa’.

“The full moon has come upon us. From beyond the hills of Thaniyaati-l Wadaa Grateful we must be. For what to God he calls? O you who has been sent among us? You came with a mission to be obeyed. You came, you honoured the city; Welcome, O best of those w ho call (to God).

As the procession of the blessed Prophet wended its way, all around there were joyful hearts, tears of ecstasy, smiles of sheer happiness.

Far away from these scenes of jubilation and delight was a young man named Uqbah ibn Aamir al- Juhani. He had gone out to the bawadi, the open expanses of desert, to graze his flocks of sheep and goats on the sparse vegetation. He had wandered far in search of fodder for his hungry flock. It was difficult to find suitable grazing grounds and he was constantly afraid that his flock would perish. They were all he possessed and he did not want to lose them.

The happiness which engulfed Yathrib, henceforth to be known as the radiant city of the Prophet, soon spread to the near and distant bawadi and reached every nook and corner of the land. The good news of the Prophet’s arrival finally reached Uqbah as he t ended his flocks far away in the inhospitable desert. His response to the news was immediate as he himself relates: “The Prophet, may God bless him and grant him peace, came to Madinah while I was tending my sheep. When I heard the news of his coming, I set out to meet him without delay. When I met him I asked:

‘Will you accept my pledge of allegiance, O Messenger of God?’ ‘And who are you?’ asked the Prophet. ‘Uqbah ibn Aamir al-Juhani ,’ I replied. ‘Which do you prefer,’ he asked, ‘the pledge of a nomad or the pledge of someone who has migrated?’ ‘The pledge o f someone who has migrated,’ I said. So the Messenger of God took the same pledge from me as he did from the Muhajirin. I spent the night with him and then went back to my flock.

There were twelve of us who had accepted Islam but we lived far from the city tending our sheep and goats in the open country. We came to the conclusion that it would be good for us if we went to the Prophet daily, so that he could instruct us in our religion and recite for us whatever revelation he had received from on high. I told the others:

‘Take turns to go to the Messenger of God, peace be on him. Anyone going may leave his sheep with me because I am too worried and concerned about my own flock to leave them in the care of someone else.’

Each day, one after another of my friends went to the Prophet, leaving his sheep for me to look after. When each returned, I learnt from him what he had heard and benefitted from what he had understood. Before long, however, I returned to my senses and said to myself:

‘Woe to you! Is it because of a flock of sheep that you remain thin and wretched and lose the opportunity to be in the company of the Prophet and to speak directly to him without an intermediary’:’ With this, I left my flock, went to Madinah and stayed in the masjid close to the Messenger of God, may God bless him and grant him peace.”

Uqbah had no reason to regret having taken this fateful decision. Within a decade, he had become one of the outstanding scholars among the companions of the Prophet, a competent and beautiful reciter of the Quran, a military commander and later on one of the eminent Muslim governors as Islam spread east and west with astonishing rapidity.

He could never have imagined as he left his flock to follow the teachings of the noble Prophet, that he would have been among the vanguard of the Muslim forces that liberated fertile Damascus – then known as the “mother of the universe” and that he would have a house for himself among its verdant gardens. He could never have imagined that he would be one of the commanders who liberated Egypt, then known as the “emerald o f the world”, and that he would be one of its governors.

The fateful decision however was taken. Alone, without possessions. or relatives, Uqbah came to Madinah from the hawadi. He stayed with others like him on the Suffah or elevated part of the Prophet’s mosque, near his house. The Suffah was like a reception point where people like Uqbah would go because they wanted to be close to the Prophet. They were known as the “Ashab as-Suffah” and the Prophet once described them as the “guests of Islam”.

Because they had no income, the Prophet always shared his food with them and encouraged others to be generous to these “guests”. They spent much of their time studying the Quran and learning about Islam. What a marvellous opportunity they had! They were in close and regular contact with the Prophet. He had a special love and concern for them and took care to educate them and look after them in all respects. Uqbah gave an example of how the Prophet trained and taught them. He said:

“One day, the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, came out to us while we were on the Suffah and asked:

‘Which of you would like to go out to the open country or a valley every day and fetch for himself two beautiful, black camels?’ (Such camels were considered prize possessions.)

‘Everyone of us would like that, O Messenger of God,’ we all replied.

‘Now,’ he said, ‘each one of you should go to the mosque and learn two ayats (verses) of the Book of God. This is better for him than two camels; three verses are better than three camels; four verses are better than four camels (and son).”

In this way, the Prophet tried to bring about a change in attitudes among those who had accepted Islam, a change from obsession with acquiring worldly possessions to an attitude of devotion to knowledge. His simple example provided them with motivation an d a powerful incentive to acquire knowledge.

On other occasions, the Ashab as-Suffah would ask questions of the Prophet in order to understand their religion better. Once, Uqbah said, he asked the Prophet, “What is salvation?” and he replied: “Control your tongue, make your house spacious for guests and spurn your mistakes.”

Even outside the mosque, Uqbah tried to stay close to the Prophet. On journeys, he often took the reins of the Prophet’s mule and went wherever the Prophet desired.

Sometimes he followed directly behind the Prophet, peace be on him, and so came to be called the redif of the Prophet. On some occasions, the Prophet would descend from his mount and allow Uqbah to ride while he himself walked. Uqbah described one such occasion:

“I took hold of the reins of the Prophet’s mule while passing through some palm groves of Madinah. ‘Uqbah ,’ the Prophet said to me, ‘don’t you want to ride.’?’

I thought of saying ‘no’ but I felt there might be an element of disobedience to the Prophet in such a reply so I said: ‘Yes, O Prophet of God.’

The Prophet then got down from his mule and I mounted in obedience to his command. He began to walk. Shortly afterwards I dismounted. The Prophet mounted again and said to me:

‘Uqbah, shall I not teach you two surahs the like of which has not been heard before.’?’

‘Certainly, O Messenger of God,’ I replied. And so he recited to me “Qul a’udhu bi rabbi-l Falaq” and “Qul a’udhu bi rabbi-n nas” (the last two surahs of the Quran). I then said the Iqamah for Salat. The Prophet led the Salat and recited these two surahs. (Afterwards), he said: ‘Read both these surahs when you go to sleep and whenever you wake up.'”

The above instances show “continuous education” at its best, at home, in the mosque, riding, walking in the open school of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace.

Two objectives occupied Uqbah’s attention throughout his life; the search for knowledge and jihad in the path of God. He applied his energies totally to these objectives.

In the field of learning, he drank deeply from the fountain of knowledge that was the Messenger of God, peace be on him. Uqbah became a distinguished muqri (reciter of the Quran), a muhaddith (recorder and narrator of the sayings of the Prophet); a faqih (jurist); a faradi (expert on the Islamic laws of inheritance); an adib (literateur); a fasih (orator) and a sha’ir (poet).

In reciting the Quran, he had a most pleasant and beautiful voice. In the stillness of the night, when the entire universe seems peaceful and tranquil, he would turn to the Book of God, and recite its overpowering verses. The hearts of the noble companion s would be drawn to his recitation. Their whole being would be shaken and they would be moved to tears from the fear of God which his recitation induced.

One day Umar ibn al-Khattab invited him and said:

“Recite for me something from the Book of God, O Uqbah.” “At your command, O Amir al-Muminin,” said Uqbah and began reciting. Umar wept till his beard was wet.

Uqbah left a copy of the Quran written in his own hand. It is said that this copy of the Quran existed until quite recently in Egypt in the well-known mosque named after Uqbah ibn Aamir himself. At the end of this text was written: “Uqbah ibn Aamir al-Juh ani wrote it.” This Mushaf of Uqbah was one of the earliest copies of the Quran in existence but it was lost in its entirety with other priceless documents due to the carelessness of Muslims.

In the field of Jihad, it is sufficient to know that Uqbah fought beside the Prophet, peace be on him, at the Battle of Uhud and in all the military engagements thereafter.

He was also one of the valiant and daring group of shock troopers who were tested to their maximum during the battle for Damascus. In recognition for his outstanding services, the commander of the Muslim forces then, Abu Ubaydah ibn al- Jarrah, despatched Uqbah to Madinah to convey the good news of the liberation of Damascus to Umar ibn al-Khattab. Uqbah spent eight days and seven nights, from Friday to Friday, in a continuous forced march to bring the news to Umar.

Uqbah was one of the commanders of the Muslim forces that liberated Egypt. For three years he was the Muslim governor of Egypt after which he received orders from the Caliph Muawiyah to mount a naval expedition to the island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean Sea.

An indication of Uqbah’s enthusiasm for jihad is the fact that he committed to memory the sayings of the Prophet on this subject and became a specialist in narrating them to the Muslims. One of his favorite pastimes was to practice the skill of spear throwing.

Uqbah was in Egypt when he became fatally ill. He gathered his children together and gave them his final advice. He said: “My children, guard against three things: Don’t accept; my saying attributed to the Prophet, peace be on him, except from a reliable authority. Do not incur debts or take up a loan even if you are in the position of an imam. Don’t compose poetry for your hearts might be distracted thereby from the Quran.”

Uqbah ibn Aamir al-Juhani, the qari, the alim, the ghazi, died in Cairo and was buried at the foot of the Muqattam hills.

Umm Salamah

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Umm Salamah

Umm Salamah! What an eventful life she had! Her real name was Hind. She was the daughter of one of the notables in the Makhzum clan nicknamed “Zad ar-Rakib” because he was well known for his generosity partlcularly to travellers. Umm Salamah’s husband was Abdullah ibn Abdulasad and they both were among the first persons to accept Islam. Only Abu Bakr and a few others, who could be counted on the fingers of one hand, became Muslims before them.

As soon as the news of their becoming Muslims spread, the Quraysh reacted with frenzied anger. They began hounding and persecuting Umm Salamah and her husband. But the couple did not waver or despair and remained steadfast in their new faith.

The persecution became more and more intense. Life in Makkah became unbearable for many of the new Muslims. The Prophet, peace be upon him, then gave permission for them to emigrate to Abyssinia. Umm Salamah and her husband were in the forefront of these muhajirun, seekers of refuge in a strange land. For Umm Salamah it meant abandoning her spacious home and giving up the traditional ties of lineage and honour for something new and hope in the pleasure and reward of Allah.

Despite the protection Umm Salamah and her companions received from the Abyssinian ruler, the desire to return to Makkah, to be near the Prophet(S.A.W) and the source of relevation and guidance persisted.

News eventually reached the muhajirun that the number of Muslims in Makkah had increased. Among them were Hamzah ibn Abdulmuttalib and Umar ibn al-Khattab. Their faith had greatly strengthened the community and the Quraysh they heard, had eased the persecution somewhat. Thus a group of the muhajirun, urged on by a deep longing in their hearts, decided to return to Makkah.

The easing of the persecution was but brief as the returnees soon found out. The dramatic increase in the number of Muslims following the acceptance of Islam by Hamzah and Umar only infuriated the Quraysh even more. They intensified their persecution and torture to a pitch and intensity not known before. So the Prophet(S.A.W) gave permission to his companions to emigrate to Madinah. Umm Salamah and her husband were among the first to leave.

The hijrah of Umm Salamah and her husband though was not as easy as they had imagined. In fact, it was a bitter and painful experience and a particularly harrowing one for her.

Let us leave the story now for Umm Salamah herself to tell . . .

When Abu Salamah (my husband) decided to leave for Madinah, he prepared a camel for me, hoisted me on it and placed our son Salamah on my lap. My husband then took the lead and went on without stopping or waiting for anything. Before we were out of Makkah however some men from my clan stopped us and said to my husband:

“Though you are free to do what you like with yourself, you have no power over your wife. She is our daughter. Do you expect us to allow you to take her away from us?”

They then pounced on him and snatched me away from him. My husband’s clan, Banu Abdulasad, saw them taking both me and my child. They became hot with rage.

“No! By Allah,” they shouted, “we shall not abandon the boy. He is our son and we have a first claim over him.”

They took him by the hand and pulled him away from me. Suddenly in the space of a few moments, I found myself alone and lonely. My husband headed for Madinah by himself and his clan had snatched my son away from me. My own clan, Banu Makhzum, overpowered me and forced me to stay with them.

From the day when my husband and my son were separated from me, I went out at noon every day to that valley and sat at the spot where this tragedy occurred. I would recall those terrible moments and weep until night fell on me.

I continued like this for a year or so until one day a man from the Banu Umayyah passed by and saw my condition. He went back to my clan and said:

“Why don’t you free this poor woman? You have caused her husband and her son to be taken away from her.”

He went on trying to soften their hearts and play on their emotions. At last they said to me, “Go and join your husband if you wish.”

But how could I join my husband in Madinah and leave my son, a piece of my own flesh and blood, in Makkah among the Banu Abdulasad? How could I be free from anguish and my eyes be free from tears were I to reach the place of hijrah not knowing anything of my little son left behind in Makkah?

Some realised what I was going through and their hearts went out to me. They petitioned the Banu Abdulasad on my behalf and moved them to return my son.

I did not now even want to linger in Makkah till I found someone to travel with me and I was afraid that something might happen that would delay or prevent me from reaching my husband. So I promptly got my camel ready, placed my son on my lap and left in the direction of Madinah.

I had just about reached Tan’im (about three miles from Makkah) when I met Uthman ibn Talhah. (He was a keeper of the Ka’bah in preIslamic times and was not yet a Muslim.)

“Where are you going, Bint Zad ar-Rakib?” he asked.

“I am going to my husband in Madinah.”

“And there isn’t anyone with you?”

“No, by Allah. Except Allah and my little boy here.”

“By Allah, I shall never abandon you until you reach Madinah,” he vowed.

He then took the reins of my camel and led us on. I have, by Allah, never met an Arab more generous and noble than he. When we reached a resting place, he would make my camel kneel down, wait until I dismounted, lead the camel to a tree and tether it. He would then go to the shade of another tree. When we had rested he would get the camel ready and lead us on.

This he did every day until we reached Madinah. When we got to a village near Quba (about two miles from Madinah) belonging to Banu Amr ibn Awf, he said, “Your husband is in this village. Enter it with the blessings of God. ”

He turned back and headed for Makkah.

Their roads finally met after the long separation. Umm Salamah was overjoyed to see her husband and he was delighted to see his wife and son.

Great and momentous events followed one after the other. There was the battle of Badr in which Abu Salamah fought. The Muslims returned victorious and strengthened. Then there was the battle of Uhud in which the Muslims were sorely tested. Abu Salamah came out of this wounded very badly. He appeared at first to respond well to treatment, but his wounds never healed completely and he remained bedridden.

Once while Umm Salamah was nursing him, he said to her:

“I heard the Messenger of God saying. Whenever a calamity afflicts anyone he should say, “Surely from Allah we are and to Him we shall certainly return.” And he would pray, ‘O Lord, give me in return something good from it which only You, Exalted and Mighty, can give.'”

Abu Salamah remained sick in bed for several days. One morning the Prophet(S.A.W) came to see him. The visit was longer than usual. While the Prophet(S.A.W) was still at his bedside Abu Salamah passed away. With his blessed hands, the Prophet(S.A.W) closed the eyes of his dead companion. He then raised these hands to the heavens and prayed:

“O Lord, grant forgiveness to Abu Salamah. Elevate him among those who are near to You. Take charge of his family at all times. Forgive us and him, O Lord of the Worlds. Widen his grave and make it light for him.”

Umm Salamah remembered the prayer her husband had quoted on his deathbed from the Prophet(S.A.W) and began repeating it, “O Lord, with you I leave this my plight for consideration . . .” But she could not bring herself to continue . . . “O Lord give me something good from it”, because she kept asking herself, “Who could be better than Abu Salamah?” But it did not take long before she completed the supplication.

The Muslims were greatly saddened by the plight of Umm Salamah. She became known as “Ayyin al- Arab” and the one who had lost her husband. She had no one in Madinah of her own except her small children, like a hen without feathers.

Both the Muhajirun and Ansar felt they had a duty to Umm Salamah. When she had completed the Iddah (three months and ten days), Abu Bakr proposed marriage to her but she refused. Then Umar asked to marry her but she also declined the proposal. The Prophet(S.A.W) then approached her and she replied:

“O Messenger of Allah, I have three characteristics. I am a woman who is extremely jealous and I am afraid that you will see in me something that will anger you and cause Allah to punish me. I am a woman who is already advanced in age and I am a woman who has a young family.”

The Prophet replied:

“Regarding the jealousy you mentioned, I pray to Allah the Almighty to let it go away from you. Regarding the question of age you have mentioned. I am afflicted with the same problem as you. Regarding the dependent family you have mentioned, your family is my family.”

They were married and so it was that Allah answered the prayer of Umm Salamah and gave her better than Abu Salamah. From that day on Hind al Makhzumiyah was no longer the mother of Salamah alone but became the mother of all believers, Umm al-Mu’mineen.

Scanned from: “Companions of The Prophet”, Vol. 1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.

Umayr Ibn Wahb

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Umayr Ibn Wahb

Umayr ibn Wahb al-Jumahi returned safely from the Battle of~Badr. His son, Wahb, was left behind, a prisoner in the hands of the Muslims. Umayr feared that the Muslims would punish the youth severely because of the persecution he himself had meted out to the Prophet(S.A.W) and the torture he had inflicted on his companions.

One morning Umayr went to the Sacred Mosque to make tawaf around the Ka’bah and worship his idols. He found Safwan ibn Umayyah sitting near the Ka’bah, went up to him and said:

“Im Sabahan (Good Morning), Quraysh chieftain.”

“Im Sabahan, Ibn Wahb,” replied Safwan. “Let us talk for some time. Time only goes by with conversation.”

Umayr sat next to him. The two men began to recall Badr, the great defeat they had suffered and they counted the prisoners who had fallen into the hands of Muhammad and his companions. They became deeply distressed at the number of great Quraysh men who had been killed by the swords of the Muslims and who lay buried in the mass grave at alQalib in Badr.

Safwan ibn Umayyah shook his head and sighed, “By God, there can be no better after them.”

“You are right,” declared Umayr. He remained silent for a while and then said, “By the God of the Ka’bah, if I had no debts and no family whose loss I fear after me, I would go to Muhammad and kill him, finish off his mission and check his evil.” He went on in a faint, subdued voice, “And as my son Wahb is among them, my going to Yathrib would be beyond doubt.”

Safwan ibn Umayyah listened intently to the words of Umayr and did not wish this opportunity to pass. He turned to him and said:

“Umayr, place all your debt in my hands and I will discharge it for you whatever the amount. As for your family, I shall take them as my own family and give them whatever they need. I have enough wealth to guarantee them a comfortable living.”

“Agreed,” said Umayr. “But keep this conversation of ours secret and do not divulge any of it to anyone.”

“That shall be so,” said Safwan.

Umayr left the Masjid al-Haram with the fire of hatred against Muhammad blazing in his heart. He began to count what he needed for the task he had set himself. He knew that he had the full support and confidence of the Quraysh who had members of their families held prisoner in Madinah.

Umayr had his sword sharpened and coated with poison. His camel was prepared and brought to him. He mounted the beast and rode in the direction of Madinah with evil in his heart.

Umayr reached Madinah and went directly towards the mosque looking for the Prophet(S.A.W). Near the door of the mosque, he alighted and tethered his camel.

At that time, Umar was sitting with some of the Sahabah near the door of the Mosque, reminiscing about Badr, the number of prisoners that had been taken and the number of Quraysh killed. They also recalled the acts of heroism shown by the Muslims, both the Muhajirun and the Ansar and gave thanks to God for the great victory He had given them.

At that very moment Umar turned around and saw Umayr ibn Wahb alighting from his camel and going towards the Mosque brandishing his sword. Alarmed, he jumped up and shouted. “This is the dog, the enemy of God, Umayr ibn Wahb. By God, he has only come to do evil. He led the Mushrikeen against us in Makkah and he was a spy for them against us shortly before Badr. Go to the Messenger of God, stand around him and warn him that this dirty traitor is after him.”

Umar himself hastened to the Prophet(S.A.W) and said, “O Rasulullah, this enemy of God, Umayr ibn Wahb, has come brandishing his sword and I think that he could only be up to something evil.”

“Let him come in,” said the Prophet(S.A.W)

Umar approached Umayr, took hold of him by the tails of his robes, pressed the back of his sword against his neck and took him to the Prophet(S.A.W). When the Prophet(S.A.W) saw Umayr in this condition he said to Umar:

“Release him.” He then turned to Umayr and said:

“Come closer.”

Umayr came closer and said, “Anim Sabahan (the Arab greeting in the days of Jahiliyyah).”

“God has granted us a greeting better than this, Umayr,” said the Prophet. “God has granted us the greeting of Peace it is the greeting of the people of Paradise.”

“What have you come for?” continued the Prophet(S.A.W).

“I came here hoping to have the prisoner in your hands released, so please oblige me.” “And what is this sword around your neck for?” quizzed the Prophet(S.A.W)

“Tell me the truth. What have you come for, Umayr?” prodded the Prophet(S.A.W)

“I have only come to have the prisoner released,” insisted Umayr.

“No. You and Safwan ibn Umayyah sat near the Ka’bah recalling your companions who lie buried at al-Qalib and then you said, ‘If I had no debt or no family to look after, I would certainly go out to kill Muhammad.’ Safwan took over your debt and promised to look after your family in return for your agreeing to kill me. But God is a barrier between you and your achieving your aim.”

Umayr stood stupefied for a moment, then said:

“I bear witness that you are the messenger of God.”

“We used, O messenger of God,” he continued, “to reject whatever good you had brought and whatever revelation came to you. But my conversation with Safwan ibn Umayyah was not known to anyone else. By God, I am certain that only God could have made this known to you. Praise be to God Who has led me to you that He may guide me to Islam.” He then testified that there is no god but Allah and that Muhammad is the messenger of Allah and became a Muslim. Thereupon, the Prophet(S.A.W) instructed his companions:

“Instruct your brother in his religion. Teach him the Qur’an and set free his prisoner.”

The Muslims were extremely happy with Umayr’s acceptance of Islam. Even Umar, who once said of him, “A pig is certainly dearer to me than Umayr ibn Wahb” came up to the Prophet(S.A.W) and exclaimed, “Today, he is dearer to me than some of my own children.”

Thereafter Umayr spent much time increasing his knowledge of Islam and filling his heart with the light of the Qur’an. There, in Madinah, he spent the sweetest and richest days of his life away from what he had known in Makkah.

Back in Makkah, Safwan was filled with hope and would say to the Quraysh, “I will soon give you some great news that would make you forget the events of Badr.”

Safwan waited for a long time and then gradually became more and more anxious. Greatly agitated, he would go out and ask travellers what news they had of Umayr ibn Wahb but no one was able to give him a satisfactory reply. Eventually a rider came and said, “Umayr has become a Muslim.”

The news hit Safwan like a thunderbolt. He was certain that Umayr would never become a Muslim and if he ever did then everyone on the face of the earth would become Muslim also. ‘Never shall I speak to him and never shall I do anything for him,” he said.

Umayr meanwhile kept on striving to gain a good understanding of his religion and memorize whatever he could of the words of God. When he felt he had achieved a certain degree of confidence, he went to the Prophet(S.A.W) and said: “O Rasulullah, much time has passed since I used to try to put out the light of God and severely tortured whoever was on the path of Islam. Now, I desire that you should give me permission to go to Makkah and invite the Quraysh to God and His Messenger. If they accept it from me, that will be good. And if they oppose me, I shall harass them as I used to harass the companions of the Prophet.”

The Prophet(S.A.W) gave his consent and Umayr left for Makkah. He went straight to the house of Safwan ibn Umayyah and said:

“Safwan, you are one of the chieftains of Makkah and one of the most intelligent of the Quraysh. Do you really think that these stones you are worshipping and making sacrifice to, deserve to be the basis of a religion? As for myself, I declare that there is no god but Allah and that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah.”

At Umayr’s hands, many Makkans became Muslims, but Safwan did not.

Later, during the liberation of Makkah, Safwan ibn Umayyah attempted to flee from the Muslim forces. Umayr, however, obtained an amnesty from the Prophet(S.A.W) for him and he too became a Muslim and distinguished himself in the service of Islam.

From: “Companions of The Prophet”, Vol.1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.

Umayr ibn Sad al-Ansari

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Umayr ibn Sad al-Ansari

Umayr ibn Sad became an orphan at an early age. His father died leaving him and his mother poor and destitute. His mother eventually married again, to one of the richest men in Madinah. His name was Julas ibn Suwayd who was from the powerful tribe of al-Aws.

Umayr was well looked after by Julas and loved him as a son would love a father. Indeed he began to forget that he was an orphan. As Umayr grew older, Julas fondness and love for him grew. Julas would marvel at the intelligence he displayed in everything he did and at the honesty and trustworthiness which characterized his behavior.

When he was barely ten years old, Umayr became a Muslim. Faith found in his tender heart a secure niche and penetrated deeply into his being. In spite of youthfulness, he would never delay in the performance of salat behind the noble Prophet.

Often he would be found in the first row of worshippers, hoping for the thawab promised those who attend mosques early and sit in the foremost rows. His mother was particularly pleased whenever she saw him going to and coming from the mosque, sometimes with her husband and sometimes alone.

Umayr’s days passed in this fashion with no major disturbance to upset his calm and contentment. This idyllic state, however, could not last forever. Umayr was soon to face a most difficult test for a boy of his age, a test which shook the peaceful and loving atmosphere of his home and challenged the steadfastness of his faith.

In the ninth year after the Hijrah, the Prophet, peace and blessings of God be on him, announced his intention to lead an expedition to Tabuk against the Byzantine forces. He ordered the Muslims to get themselves ready and make the necessary preparations.

Usually when the Prophet(S.A.W) wanted to go on a military campaign he would not give precise details of his objective or he would set off in a direction opposite to his intended destination. This was for security purposes and to confound the enemy’s intelligence service. This he did not do in announcing the expedition to Tabuk. This was perhaps because of the great distance of Tabuk from Madinah, the enormous difficulties expected and the overwhelming strength of the enemy.

The preparations needed for this expedition had to be extensive. In spite of the fact that summer had set in and the intense heat produced languor and listlessness, and in spite of the fact that the date crops needed harvesting, the Muslims responded enthusiastically to the call of the Prophet(S.A.W) and busied themselves in preparing for the arduous campaign ahead.

There was however a group of munafiqun or hypocrites who outwardly had declared their acceptance of Islam but inwardly did not believe in it. They were critical of the expedition and tried to weaken the resolve of the Muslims. They even ridiculed the Prophet(S.A.W) in their private gatherings. Disbelief and hatred remained in their hearts.

One day, shortly before the army was due to set out, the young Umayr ibn Sad returned home after performing Salat in the mosque. He was all agog with excitement. He had just witnessed the great generosity and the spontaneous spirit of sacrifice which the Muslims displayed in preparing for the expedition. He had seen women of the Muhajirin and the Ansar donating their jewellery and their ornaments to buy provisions and equipment for the army. He had seen Uthman ibn Affan handing over a purse containing a thousand gold dinars to the Prophet(S.A.W) and Abdur Rahman ibn Awl carrying on his shoulders two hundred awqiyyah of gold and placing it before the noble Prophet.

Indeed he had even seen a man trying to sell his bed in order to purchase a sword for himself.

At home, he recalled these moving and inspiring people scenes. He was surprised however that Julas was so slow in preparing for the expedition with the Prophet(S.A.W) and at his delay in contributing especially since he was quite rich and could afford to give generously. Umayr felt that he had to arouse his ardor or stir his sense of generosity and manliness.

So with great enthusiasm he related what he had seen and heard at the mosque particularly the case of those believers who, with great fervor, had come to enlist themselves in the army and were turned away by the Prophet(S.A.W) because there was not sufficient means of transport. He related how sad and disappointed these people were at not realizing their desire to go on the path of Jihad and sacrifice for the sake of Islam. Julas’ response was sharp and shocking.

“If Muhammad is true in claiming that he is a Prophet ,” he shouted angrily, “then we are all worse than donkeys.”

Umayr was flabbergasted. He could not believe what he had heard. He did not think that a man as intelligent as Julas could have uttered such words, words which put him instantly outside the pale of faith.

A host of questions paced through his mind and he immediately began to consider what action he should take. He saw in Julas’ silence and his tardiness to respond to the Prophet’s call, clear signs of a traitor to God and His Prophet, who wanted to bring harm to Islam in just the same way as the munafiqun who were plotting and conspiring against the Prophet. At the same time he saw a man who had treated him as a father and who was kind and generous to him, who had taken him as an orphan and had saved him from poverty.

Umayr had to choose between preserving this close relationship with Julas on the one hand and dealing with his treachery and hypocrisy on the other. The choice was painful but his decision was swift. He turned to Julas and said:

“By God, O Julas, there is no one on the face of the earth, after Muhammad ibn Abdullah, dearer to me than you. You are the closest of men to me and you have been most generous to me. But you have uttered words which, if I should mention them will expose and humiliate you. If I conceal them, however, I will be a traitor to my trust and destroy myself and my religion. I will, therefore, go to the Messenger of God, peace be upon him, and tell him what you have said. It is up to you to clarify your position.”

The young Umayr went to the mosque and told the Prophet(S.A.W) what he had heard from Julas. The Prophet(S.A.W) asked him to stay with him and sent one of his companions to summon Julas.

Julas came, greeted the Prophet(S.A.W) and sat in front of him. The Prophet, peace be upon him straightaway asked him: “What did you say that Umayr ibn Sad heard?” and he mentioned what Umayr had reported to him.

“He has lied against me, O Messenger of God, and has fabricated this. I have not uttered anything of the sort” asserted Julas.

The companions of the Prophet(S.A.W) looked alternately at Julas and Umayr hoping to detect on their faces what their hearts concealed. They began to mutter among themselves. One of those in whose hearts was the disease of hypocrisy asserted:

“The youth is a nuisance. He is bent on defaming someone who has been good to him.” Others replied: “Not at all. He is a youth who grew up in obedience to God. The expressions on his face attest to his truthfulness.”

The Prophet, peace be on him, turned to Umayr and saw his flushed face and the tears streaming down his cheeks. Umayr prayed:

“O Lord, send down a revelation on Your Prophet to verify what I have told him.” Julas meanwhile continued to defend what he had said: “What I have told you, O Messenger of God, is certainly the truth. If you wish, make us swear an oath in your presence. I swear by God that I did not say anything of the sort that Umayr reported to you.”

As the companions turned to Umayr to hear what he had to say, they saw the Prophet(S.A.W) come under a special mood of serenity and they realized that he was being inspired. Immediately there was complete silence as they gazed intently at the Prophet in anticipation.

At this point, fear and terror gripped Julas and he began to look tremulously at Umayr. The Prophet, having received the revelation, recited the words of God:

“(The hypocrites) swear by God that they have said (nothing wrong); yet most certainly they have uttered a saying which is a denial of the truth, and have thus denied the truth after having professed their self-surrender to God; for they were aiming at something which was beyond their reach. And they could find no fault (with the Faith) save that God had enriched them and (caused) His Apostle to enrich them out of His bounty. Hence, if they repent, it will be for their own good; but if they turn away, God will cause them to suffer a grievous suffering in this world and in the life to come and they will find no helper on earth, and none to give them succour.” (The Quran, Surah at-Tawbah, 9:74).

Julas trembled with fear at what he heard and in his anguish, could hardly speak. Finally, he turned to the Prophet and said: “I do repent, O Messenger of God. I do repent. Umayr told the truth and I lied. I beseech God to accept my repentance…”

The Prophet turned to the young Umayr. Tears of joy moistened his youthful face, radiant with the light of faith. With his noble hand, the Prophet(S.A.W) tenderly took his ear and said:

“Young man, your ear has been true in what it heard and your Lord has confirmed the truth of what you said.” Julas returned to the fold of Islam and was a good and faithful Muslim thereafter. The companions realized that by his generosity and good treatment of Umayr, he had reformed. Whenever Umayr was mentioned, Julas would say:

“My God reward Umayr with goodness on my behalf. He certainly saved me from kufr and preserved my neck from the fire of hell.”

Umayr grew up and distinguished himself in later years with the same devotion and firmness which he had shown in early life.

During the caliphate of Umar ibn al-Khattab, the people of Hims in Syria complained much and bitterly of the governors appointed to the city even though Umar in particular used to pay special attention to the type of men he chose as his provincial governors. In selecting a governor, Umar would say: “I want a man who when he is among the people and is not their amir, should not behave as their amir, and when he is among them as an amir, he should behave as one of them.

“I want a governor who will not distinguish himself from the people by the clothes he wears, or the food he eats or the house he lives in.”

“I want a governor who would establish Salat among the people, treat them equitably and with justice and does not close his door when they come to him in need.”

In the light of the complaints of the people of Hims and going by his own criteria for a good governor, Umar ibn al-Khattab decided to appoint Umayr ibn Sad as governor of the region. This was despite the fact that Umayr at that time was at the head of a Muslim army traversing the Arabian peninsula and the region of great Syria, liberating towns, destroying enemy fortifications, pacifying the tribes and establishing masjids wherever he went. Umayr accepted the appointment as governor of Hims reluctantly because he preferred nothing better than Jihad in the path of God. He was still quite young, in his early twenties.

When Umayr reached Hims he called the inhabitants to a vast congregational prayer. When the prayer was over he addressed them. He began by praising and giving thanks to God and sending peace and blessings on His Prophet Muhammad. Then he said:

“O people! Islam is a mighty fortress and a sturdy gate. The fortress of Islam is justice and its gate is truth. If you destroy the fortress and demolish the gate you would undermine the defences of this religion.

“Islam will remain strong so long as the Sultan or central authority is strong. The strength of the Sultan neither comes from flogging with the whip, nor killing with the sword but from ruling with justice and holding fast to truth.”

Umayr spent a full year in Hims during which, it is said, he did not write a single letter to the Amir al- Muminin. Nor did he send any taxes to the central treasury in Madinah, neither a dirham nor a dinar.

Umar was always concerned about the performance of his governors and was afraid that positions of authority would corrupt them. As far as he was concerned, there was no one who was free from sin and corrupting influences apart from the noble Prophet, peace be upon him. He summoned his secretary and said:

“Write to Umayr ibn Sad and say to him: “When the letter of the Amir al-Muminin reaches you, leave Hims and come to him and bring with you whatever taxes you have collected from the Muslims.”

Umayr received the letter. He took his food pouch and hung his eating, drinking and washing utensils over his shoulder. He took his spear and left Hims and the governorship behind him. He set off for Madinah on foot.

As Umayr approached Madinah, he was badly sunburnt, his body was gaunt and his hair had grown long. His appearance showed all the signs of the long and arduous journey. Umar, on seeing him, was astonished. What’s wrong with you, Umayr?” he asked with deep concern.

“Nothing is wrong with me, O Amir al-Muminin,” replied Umayr. “I am fine and healthy, praise be to God, and I carry with me all (my) worldly possessions.”

“And what worldly possessions have you got?” asked Umar thinking that he was carrying money for the Bayt al-mal or treasury of the Muslims.”

“I have my pouch in which I put my food provisions. I have this vessel from which I eat and which I use for washing my hair and clothes. And I have this cup for making wudu and drinking…” “Did you come on foot?” asked Umar. “Yes, O Amir al-Muminin.” “Weren’t you given from your amirship an animal to ride on?” “They did not give me one and I did not ask them.”

“And where is the amount you brought for the Baytalmal?” “I didn’t bring anything.”

“And why not?”

“When I arrived at Hims,” said Umayr, “I called the righteous persons of the town to a meeting and gave them the responsibility of collecting the taxes. Whenever they collected any amounts of money I would seek their advice and spent it (all) on those who were deserving among them.”

At this point, Umar turned to his secretary and said:

“Renew the appointment of Umayr to the governorship of Hims.” “Oh, come now,” protested Umayr. “That is something which I do not desire. I shall not be a governor for you nor for anyone after you, O Amir al-Muminin.”

With that Umayr asked the Khalifah’s permission to go to his village on the outskirts of Madinah to live there with his family. This Umar granted.

A long time passed since Umayr had gone to his village and Umar decided to put him through a test to make sure of his circumstances. He said to one of his trusted aides called al-Harith:

“Harith, go to Umayr ibn Sad and stay with him as though you were a guest. If you see on him any signs of luxury or good living, return quietly as you went. If, however, you find him in straitened circumstances give him these dinars.” Umar handed Harith a bag with a hundred dinars.

Al-Harith set out for Umayr’s village and found his home after making enquiries. “As-salamu alaykum wa rahmatullah,” he greeted Umayr.

“Wa alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu,” replied Umayr and asked, “From where have you come?”

“From aI-Madinah.”

“How are the Muslims there?” “Fine.”

“How is the Amir al-Muminin?” “He is fine and doing well.”

“Has he applied the hudud laws?”

“Yes. He carried out the sentence of punishment on his own son for committing the crime of adultery. His son died as a result of the punishment.” Al-Harith continued: “O Allah, help Umar. I only know that he has a great love for you.”

Al-Harith stayed as Umayr’s guest for three nights. On each night he was given only a small flat piece of barley bread. On the third day a local man said to Harith:

“Umayr and his family are suffering great hardship. They only have these loaves which they have given you in preference to themselves. They are hungry and in great distress. Harith went to Umayr and gave him the bag of money.

“What is this?” asked Umayr.

“The Amir al-Muminin sent it to you.”

“Return it to him. Give him my greetings of peace and tell him that Umayr has no need of it.”

“Take it, O Umayr,” shouted his wife who was listening to the conversation between her husband and his guest. “If you need it, you can spend it. If not, you can spend it in other appropriate ways, for those in need here are many.”

When al-Harith heard what she had said, he placed the dinars in front of Umayr and left. Umayr took the money and placed it in a small bag. He only went to sleep that night after he had distributed the money to those in need and especially to the children of those who had been martyred.

Al-Harith returned to Madinah and was questioned by Umar al-Faruq. “What have you seen, Harith?”

“A very distressing situation, O Amir al-Muminin.”

“Did you give him the dinars?”

“Yes, O Amir al-Muminin.”

“What did he do with them?”

“I don’t know. But I think that he did not keep a single dirham of it for himself.”

Al-Faruq wrote to Umayr: “When you receive this letter, I do not put it down until you come to me.”

Umayr proceeded straightaway to Madinah. Umar greeted and welcomed him and proceeded to question him.

“What did you do with the dinars, Umayr?” “You have no responsibility for the money after you have donated it to me.”

“I adjure you to tell me what you did with it.”

“I stored it away for myself so that I could benefit from it a day when neither wealth nor children will be of any avail.” Tears came to Umar’s eyes as he said:

“I swear that you are one of those who are hard against themselves even when they are in dire need.” And he ordered a camel load of food and two garments to be given to Umayr who protested:

“About the food, we do not need it, O Amir al-Mumineen. I left two saas of barley with my family and when we have finished that, Allah- Great and Exalted is He – will provide. As for the two garments, I will take them for (my wife). Her dress is now in tatters and she is almost naked.”

Not long after that meeting with Umar al-Faruq, Umayr ibn Sad passed away to his Lord. He was not weighted down with the cares and burdens of the world and he was concerned to provide plenty of provisions for the hereafter. Umar received the news of his death with a heavy heart and said in deep sorrow: “I have wished to have men like Umayr ibn Sad whose help I could seek in dealing with the affairs of Muslims.”