Category Archives: Stories Of The Salaf

Sa’d Ibn Abi Waqqas

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Sa’d Ibn Abi Waqqas

We are now in a small town in a narrow valley. There is no vegetation, no livestock, no gardens, no rivers. Desert after desert separates the town from the rest of the world. During the day the heat of the sun is unbearable and the nights are still and lonely. Tribes flock to it like animals in the open country flock to a water-hole. No government rules. There is no religion to guide people except one which promotes the worship of stone idols. There is no knowledge except priestcraft and a love for elegant poetry. This is Makkah and these are the Arabs.

In this town lies a young man who has not yet seen twenty summers. He is short and well-built and has a very heavy crop of hair. People compare him to a young lion. He comes from a rich and noble family. He is very attached to his parents and is particularly fond of his mother. He spends much of his time making and repairing bows and arrows and practising archery as if preparing himself for some great encounter. People recognize him as a serious and intelligent young man. He finds no satisfaction in the religion and way of life of his people, their corrupt beliefs and disagreeable practices. His name is Sad ibn Abi Waqqas.

One morning at about this time in his life the genial Abu Bakr came up and spoke softly to him. He explained that Muhammad ibn Abdullah the son of his late cousin Aminah bint Wahb had been given Revelations and sent with the religion of guidance and truth. Abu Bakr then took him to Muhammad in one of the valleys of Makkah. It was late afternoon by this time and the Prophet(S.A.W) had just prayed Salat al- Asr. Sa’d was excited and overwhelmed and responded readily to the invitation to truth and the religion of One God. The fact that he was one of the first persons to accept Islam was something that pleased him greatly.

The Prophet, peace be on him, was also greatly pleased when Sad became a Muslim. He saw in him signs of excellence. The fact that he was still in his youth promised great things to come. It was as if this glowing crescent would become a shining full moon before long. Perhaps other young people of Makkah would follow his example, including some of his relations. For Sa’d ibn Abi Waqqas was in fact a maternal uncle of the Prophet(S.A.W) since he belonged to the Bani Zuhrah, the clan of Aminah bint Wahb, the mother of the Prophet, peace be upon him. For this reason he is sometimes referred to as Sa’d of Zuhrah, to distinguish him from several others whose first name was Sad.

The Prophet(S.A.W) is reported to have been pleased with his family relationship to Sa’d. Once as he was sitting with his companions, he saw Sad approaching and he said to them: “This is my maternal uncle. Let a man see his maternal uncle!”

While the Prophet(S.A.W) was delighted with Sad’s acceptance of Islam, others including and especially his mother were not. Sad relates: “When my mother heard the news of my Islam, she flew into a rage. She came up to me and said:

“O Sa’d! What is this religion that you have embraced which has taken you away from the religion of your mother and father…? By God, either you forsake your new religion or I would not eat or drink until I die. Your heart would be broken with grief for me and remorse would consume you on account of the deed which you have done and people would censure you forever more.’

‘Don’t do (such a thing), my mother,’ I said, ‘for I would not give up my religion for anything.’

However, she went on with her threat… For days she neither ate nor drank. She became emaciated and weak. Hour after hour, I went to her asking whether I should bring her some food or something to drink but she persistently refused, insisting that she would neither eat nor drink until she died or I abandoned my religion. I said to her:

‘Yaa Ummaah! In spite of my strong love for you, my love for God and His Messenger is indeed stronger. By God, if you had a thousand souls and one soul after another were to depart, I would not abandon this my religion for anything.’ When she saw that I was determined she relented unwillingly and ate and drank.”

It was concerning Sa’d’s relationship with his mother and her attempt to force him to recant his faith that the words of the Quran were revealed: “And we enjoined on man (to be good) to his parents. In pain upon pain did his mother bear him and his weaning took two years. So show gratitude to Me and to your parents. To Me is the final destiny. “But if they strive to make you join in worship with Me things of which you have no knowledge, obey them not. Yet bear them company in this life with justice and consideration and follow the way of those who turn to Me. In the end, the return of you all is to Me and I shall tell you (the truth and meaning of) all that you used to do.” (Surah Luqman, 31: 14-15).

In these early days of Islam, the Muslims were careful not to arouse the sensibilities of the Quraysh. They would often go out together in groups to the glens outside Makkah where they could pray together without being seen. But one day a number of idolaters came upon them while they were praying and rudely interrupted them with ridicule. The Muslims felt they could not suffer these indignities passively and they came to blows with the idolaters. Sa’d ibn Abi Waqqas struck one of the disbelievers with the jawbone of a camel and wounded him. This was the first blood shed in the conflict between Islam and kufr – a conflict that was later to escalate and test the patience and courage of the Muslims.

After the incident, however, the Prophet(S.A.W) enjoined his companions to be patient and forbearing for this was the command of God: “And bear with patience what they say and avoid them with noble dignity. And leave Me alone to deal with those who give the lie to the Truth, those who enjoy the blessings of life (without any thought of God) and bear with them for a little while.”

(The Quran, Surah al Muzzammil, 71: 10).

More than a decade later when permission was given for the Muslims to fight. Sa’d ibn Abi Waqqas was to play a distinguished role in many of the engagements that took place both during the time of the Prophet(S.A.W) and after. He fought at Badr together with his young brother Umayr who had cried to be allowed to accompany the Muslim army for he was only in his early teens. Sa’d returned to Madinah alone for Umayr was one of the fourteen Muslim martyrs who fell in the battle.

At the Battle of Uhud, Sad was specially chosen as one of the best archers together with Zayd, Saib the son of Uthman ibn Mazun and others. Sa’d was one of those who fought vigorously in defence of the Prophet(S.A.W) after some Muslims had deserted their positions. To urge him on, the Prophet, peace be on him, said: “Irmi Sa’d…Fidaaka Abi wa Ummi ” Shoot, Sa’d …may my mother and father be your ransom.”

Of this occasion, Ali ibn Abi Talib said that he had not yet heard the Prophet, peace be on him, promising such a ransom to anyone except Sad. Sad is also known as the first companion to have shot an arrow in defence of Islam. And the Prophet(S.A.W) once prayed for him:

“O Lord, direct his shooting and respond to his prayer.” Sa’d was one of the companions of the Prophet(S.A.W) who was blessed with great wealth. Just as he was known for his bravery, so he was known for his generosity. During the Farewell Pilgrimage with the Prophet(S.A.W) he fell ill. The Prophet(S.A.W) came to visit him and Sa’d said:

“O Messenger of God. I have wealth and I only have one daughter to inherit from me. Shall I give two thirds of my wealth as sadaqah?”

“No,” replied the Prophet.

“Then, (shall I give) a half?” asked Sad and the Prophet again said ‘no’. “Then, (shall I give) a third?’ asked Sa’d.

“Yes,” said the Prophet. “The third is much. Indeed to leave your heirs well-off’ is better than that you should leave them dependent on and to beg from people. If you spend anything seeking to gain thereby the pleasure of God, you will be rewarded for it even if it is a morsel which you place in your wife’s mouth.”

Sa’d did not remain the father of just one child but was blessed thereafter with many children.

Sad is mainly renowned as the commander-in-chief of the strong Muslim army which Umar despatched to confront the Persians at Qadisiyyah. Umar wanted nothing less than an end to Sasanian power which for centuries had dominated the region.

To confront the numerous and well-equipped Persians was a most daunting task. The most powerful force had to be mustered. Umar sent despatches to Muslim governors throughout the state to mobilize all able-bodied persons who had weapons or mounts, or who had talents of oratory and other skills to place at the service of the battle.

Bands of Mujahidin then converged on Madinah from every part of the Muslim domain. When they had all gathered, Umar consulted the leading Muslims about the appointment of a commander-in-chief over the mighty army. Umar himself thought of leading the army but Ali suggested that the Muslims were in great need of him and he should not endanger his life. Sa’d was then chosen as commander and Abdur- Rahman ibn Awl, one of the veterans among the Sahabah said:

“You have chosen well! Who is there like Sa’d?” Umar stood before the great army and bade farewell to them. To the commander-in-chief he said:

“O Sa’d! Let not any statement that you are the uncle of the Messenger of God or that you are the companion of the Messenger of God distract you from God. God Almighty does not obliterate evil with evil but he wipes out evil with good.

“O Sa’d! There is no connection between God and anyone except obedience to Him. In the sight of God all people whether nobleman or commoner are the same. Allah is their Lord and they are His servants seeking elevation through taqwa and seeking to obtain what is with God through obedience.

Consider how the Messenger of God used to act with the Muslims and act accordingly…”

Umar thus made it clear that the army was not to seek conquest for the sake of it and that the expedition was not for seeking personal glory and fame.

The three thousand strong army set off. Among them were ninety nine veterans of Badr, more than three hundred of those who took the Pledge of Riffwan (Satisfaction) at Hudaybiyyah and three hundred of those who had participated in the liberation of Makkah with the noble Prophet. There were seven hundred sons of the companions. Thousands of women also went on to battle as auxiliaries and nurses and to urge the men on to battle.

The army camped at Qadisiyyah near Hira. Against them the Persians had mobilized a force of 12O,OOO men under the leadership of their most brilliant commander, Rustam.

Umar had instructed Sa’d to send him regular despatches about the condition and movements of the Muslim forces, and of the deployment of the enemy’s forces. Sa’d wrote to Umar about the unprecedented force that the Persians were mobilizing and Umar wrote to him:

“Do not be troubled by what you hear about them nor about the (forces, equipment and methods) they would deploy against you. Seek help with God and put your trust in Him and send men of insight, knowledge and toughness to him (the Chosroes) to invite him to God… And write to me daily.”

Sa’d understood well the gravity of the impending battle and kept in close contact with the military high command in Madinah. Although commander-in-chief, he understood the importance of shura.

Sa’d did as Umar instructed and sent delegations of Muslims first to Yazdagird and then to Rustam, inviting them to accept Islam or to pay the jizyah to guarantee their protection and peaceful existence or to choose war if they so desired.

The first Muslim delegation which included Numan ibn Muqarrin was ridiculed by the Persian Emperor, Yazdagird. Sa’d sent a delegation to Rustum, the commander of the Persian forces. This was led by Rubiy ibn Aamir who, with spear in hand, went directly to Rustam’s encampment. Rustum said to him:

“Rubiy! What do you want from us? If you want wealth we would give you. We would provide you with provisions until you are sated. We would clothe you. We would make you become rich and happy. Look, Rubiy! What do you see in this assembly of mine? No doubt you see signs of richness and luxury, these lush carpets, fine curtains, gold embroidered wails, carpets of silk…Do you have any desire that we should bestow some of these riches which we have on you?”

Rustum thus wanted to impress the Muslim and allure him from his purpose by this show of opulence and grandeur. Rubiy looked and listened unmoved and then said:

“Listen, O commander! Certainly God has chosen us that through us those of His creation whom He so desires could be drawn away from the worship of idols to Tawhid (the affirmation of the unity of God), from the narrow confines of preoccupation with this world to its boundless expanse and from the tyranny of rulers to justice of Islam.

“Whoever accepts that from us we are prepared to welcome him. And whoever fights us, we would fight him until the promise of God comes to pass.”

“And what is the promise of God to you?” asked Rustum.

“Paradise for our martyrs and victory for those who live.”

Rustum of course was not inclined to listen to such talk from a seemingly wretched person the likes of whom the Persians regarded as barbaric and uncivilized and whom they had conquered and subjugated for centuries.

The Muslim delegation returned to their commander in-chief. It was clear that war was now inevitable. Sa’d’s eyes filled with tears. He wished that the battle could be delayed a little or indeed that it might have been somewhat earlier. For on this particular day he was seriously ill and could hardly move. He was suffering from sciatica and he could not even sit upright for the pain.

Sa’d knew that this was going to be a bitter, harsh and bloody battle. And for a brief moment he thought, if only… but no! The Messenger of God had taught the Muslims that none of them should say, “If…..” To say “If…..” implied a lack of will and determination and wishing that a situation might have been different was not the characteristic of a firm believer. So, despite his illness, Sa’d got up and stood before his army and addressed them. He began his speech with a verse from the glorious Quran:

“And indeed after having exhorted (man), We have laid it down in all the books of Divine wisdom that My righteous servants shall inherit the earth.”

(Surah al-Anbiyaa, 21:1O5).

The address over, Sad performed Salat az-Zuhr with the army. Facing them once again, he shouted the Muslim battle cry “Allahu Akbar” four times and directed the fighters to attack with the words:

“Hayya ala barakatillah Charge, with the blessings of God.” Standing in front of his tent, Sa’d directed his soldiers and spurred them on with shouts of Allahu Akbar (God is Most Great) and La hawla wa la quwwata ilia billah (there is no power or might save with God). For four days the battle raged.

The Muslims displayed valor and skill. But a Persian elephant corps wrought havoc in the ranks of the Muslims. The ferocious battle was only resolved when several renowned Muslim warriors made a rush in the direction of the Persian commander. A storm arose and the canopy of Rustam was blown into the river. As he tried to flee he was detected and slain. Complete confusion reigned among the Persians and they fled in disarray.

Just how ferocious the battle was can be imagined when it is known that some thirty thousand persons on both sides fell in the course of four days’ fighting. In one day alone, some two thousand Muslims and about ten thousand Persians lost their lives.

The Battle of Qadisiyyah is one of the major decisive battles of world history. It sealed the fate of the Sasanian Empire just as the Battle of Yarmuk had sealed the fate of the Byzantine Empire in the east.

Two years after Qadisiyyah, Sa’d went on to take the Sasanian capital. By then he had recovered his health. The taking of Ctesiphon was accomplished after a brilliant crossing of the Tigris river while it was in flood. Sa’d has thus gone down in the annals of history as the Hero of Qadisiyyah and the Conqueror of Ctesiphon.

He lived until he was almost eighty years old. He was blessed with much influence and wealth but as the time of death approached in the year 54 AH, he asked his son to open a box in which he had kept a course woolen jubbah and said: “Shroud me in this, for in this (jubbah) I met the Mushrikin on the day of Badr and in it I desire to meet God Almighty.”

From Alim® Online

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Rabiah Ibn Kab

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Rabiah Ibn Kab

Here is the story of Rabiah told in his own words: “I was still quite young when the light of iman shone through me and my heart was opened to the teachings of Islam. And when my eyes beheld the Messenger of God(S.A.W), for the first time, I loved him with a love that possessed my entire being. I loved him to the exclusion of everyone else.

One day I said to myself:

‘Woe to you, Rabi’ah. Why don’t you put yourself completely in the service of the Messenger of God, peace be on him. Go and suggest this to him. If he is pleased with you, you would find happiness in being near him. You will be successful through love for him and you will have the good fortune of obtaining the good in this world and the good in the next.’

This I did hoping that he would accept me in his service. He did not dash my hopes. He was pleased that I should be his servant. From that day, I lived in the shadow of the noble Prophet (S.A.W). I went with him wherever he went. I moved in his orbit whenever and wherever he turned. Whenever he cast a glance in my direction, I would leap to stand in his presence. Whenever he expressed a need, he would find me hurrying to fulfil it.

I would serve him throughout the day. When the day was over and he had prayed Salat al-Isha and retired to his home, I would think about leaving. But I would soon say to myself:

‘Where would you go, Rabi’ah? Perhaps you may be required to do something for the Prophet (S.A.W) during the night.’

So I would remain seated at his door and would not leave the threshold of his house. The Prophet (S.A.W) would spend part of his night engaged in Salat. I would hear him reciting the opening chapter of the Quran and he would continue reciting sometimes for a third or a half of the night. I would become tired and leave or my eyes would get the better of me and I would fall asleep.

It was the habit of the Prophet, peace be on him, that if someone did him a good turn, he loved to repay that person with something more excellent. He wanted to do something for me too in return for my service to him. So one day he came up to me and said: ‘O Rabi’ah ibn Kab.’ ‘Labbayk ya rasulullah wa Sadark – At your command, O Messenger of God and may God grant you happiness,’ I responded. ‘Ask of me anything and I will give it to you.’

I thought a little and then said: ‘Give me some time, O Messenger of God, to think about what I should ask of you. Then I will let you know.’ He agreed. At that time, I was a young man and poor. I had neither family, nor wealth, nor place of abode. I used to shelter in the Suffah of the mosque with other poor Muslims like myself. People used to call us the “guests of Islam”. Whenever any Muslim brought something in charity to the Prophet(S.A.W) he would send it all to us. And if someone gave him a gift he would take some of it and leave the rest for us.

So, it occurred to me to ask the Prophet(S.A.W) for some worldly good that would save me from poverty and make me like others who had wealth, wife and children. Soon, however, I said: ‘May you perish Rabi’ah. The world is temporary and will pass away. You have your share of sustenance in it which God has guaranteed and which must come to you. The Prophet, peace be on him, has a place with his Lord and no request would be refused him. Request him therefore, to ask Allah to grant you something of the bounty of the hereafter.’

I felt pleased and satisfied with this thought. I went to the Prophet and he asked: ‘What do you say, O Rabi’ah?’ ‘O Messenger of God,’ I said, ‘I ask you to beseech God most High on my behalf to make me your companion in Paradise.’

‘Who has advised you thus?’ asked the Prophet.

‘No by God,’ I said, ‘No one has advise me. But when you told me ‘Ask of me anything and I will give to you,’ I thought of asking you for something of the goodness of this world. But before long, I was guided to choose what is permanent and lasting against what is temporary and perishable.

And so I have asked you to beseech God on my behalf that I may be your companion in Paradise.’

The Prophet(S.A.W) remained silent for a long while and then asked: ‘Any other request besides that, Rabi’ah?’ ‘No, O Messenger of God, Nothing can match what I have asked you.’ ‘Then, in that case, assist me for your sake by performing much prostration to God.’

So I began to exert myself in worship in order to attain the good fortune of being with the Prophet(S.A.W) in Paradise just as I had the good fortune of being in his service and being his companion in this world.

Not long afterwards, the Prophet(S.A.W) called me and asked: ‘Don’t you want to get married, Rabi’ah?’ ‘I do not want anything to distract me from your service,’ I replied. ‘Moreover, I don’t have anything to give as mahr (dowry) to a wife nor any place where I can accommodate a wife.’

The Prophet(S.A.W) remained silent. When he saw me again he asked: ‘Don’t you want to get married, Rabi’ah?’ I gave him the same reply as before. Left to myself again, I regretted what I had said and chided myself: ‘Woe to you, Rabi’ah. By God, the Prophet(S.A.W) knows better than you what is good for you in this world and the next and he also knows better than you what you possess. By God, if the Prophet, peace be on him, should ask me again to marry, I would reply positively.’

Before long, the Prophet asked me again: ‘Don’t you want to get married ‘Rabi’ah?’

‘Oh yes, Messenger of God,’ I replied, ‘but who will marry me when I am in the state you know.’ ‘Go to the family of so-and-so and say to them: the Prophet(S.A.W) has instructed you to give your daughter in marriage to me.’

Timidly, I went to the family and said: ‘The Messenger of God, peace be on him, has sent me to you to ask you to give your daughter in marriage to me.’ ‘Our daughter?’ they asked, incredulously at first. ‘Yes,’ i replied.

‘Welcome to the Messenger of God, and welcome to his messenger. By God, the messenger of God’s Messenger shall only return with his mission fulfilled. ‘So they made a marriage contract between me and her. I went back to the Prophet and reported:

‘O Messenger of Allah. I have come from the best of homes. They believed me, they welcomed me, and they made a marriage contract between me and their daughter. But from where do I get the mahr for her?’

The Prophet then sent for Buraydah ibn al-Khasib, one of the leading persons in my tribe, the Banu Asiam, and said to him: ‘O Buraydah, collect a nuwat’s weight in gold for Rabi’ah.

This they did and the Prophet(S.A.W) said to me: ‘Take this to them and say, this is the sadaq of your daughter.’ I did so and they accepted it. They were pleased and said, This is much and good.’ I went back to the Prophet(S.A.W) and told him: ‘I have never yet seen a people more generous than they. They were pleased with what I gave them in spite of its being little…Where can I get something for the walimah (marriage feast), O Prophet of God?’

The Prophet(S.A.W) said to Buraydah ‘Collect the price of a ram for Rabi’ah.’ They bought a big fat ram for me and then the Prophet(S.A.W) told me: ‘Go to Aishah and tell her to give you whatever barley she has.’

Aishah gave me a bag with seven saas of barley and said: ‘By God, we do not have any other food.’ I set off with the ram and the barley to my wife’s family. They said: ‘We will prepare the barley but get your friends to prepare the ram for you.’

We slaughtered, skinned and cooked the ram. So we had bread and meat for the walimah. I invited the Prophet(S.A.W) and he accepted my invitation.

The Prophet(S.A.W) then gave me a piece of land near Abu Bakr’s.

From then I became concerned with the dunya, with material things. I had a dispute with Abu Bakr over a palm tree.

‘It is in my land,’ I insisted. ‘No, it is in my land,’ Abu Bakr countered. We started to argue. Abu Bakr cursed me, but as soon as he had uttered the offending word he felt sorry and said to me: ‘Rabiah, say the same word to me so that it could be considered as qisas -just retaliation.’ ‘No by God, I shall not,’ I said.

‘In that case, replied Abu Bakr. ‘I shall go the Messenger of God and complain to him about your refusal to retaliate against me measure for measure.’

He set off and I followed him. My tribe, the Banu Asiam, also set off behind me protesting indignantly: ‘He’s the one who cursed you first and then he goes off to the Prophet(S.A.W) before you to complain about you!’ I turned to them and said: ‘Woe to you! Do you know who this is? This is As-Siddiq… and he is the respected elder of the Muslims.

Go back before he turns around, sees you and thinks that you have come to help me against him. He would then be more incensed and go to the Prophet(S.A.W) in anger. The Prophet(S.A.W) would get angry on his account. Then Allah would be angry on their account and Rabi’ah would be finished.’ They turned back.

Abu Bakr went to the Prophet(S.A.W) and related the incident as it had happened. The Prophet (S.A.W) raised his head and said to me:

‘O Rabi’ah, what’s wrong with you and as-Siddiq?’ ‘Messenger of God, he wanted me to say the same words to him as he had said to me and I did not.’

‘Yes, don’t say the same word to him as he had said to you. Instead say: ‘May God forgive you Abu Bakr.’ With tears in his eyes, Abu Bakr went away while saying: ‘May God reward you with goodness for my sake, O Rabiah ibn Kab… ‘May God reward you with goodness for my sake, O Rabiah ibn

Kaab…”

Nuaym Ibn Masud

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Nuaym Ibn Masud

Nuaym ibn Masud was from Najd in the northern highlands of Arabia. He belonged to the powerful Ghatafan tribe. As a young man, he was clever and alert. He was full of enterprise and travelled widely. He was resourceful, ever ready to take up a challenge and not prepared to allow any problem to get the better of him.

This son of the desert was endowed with extraordinary presence of mind and unusual subtlety. He was however someone who liked to enjoy himself and gave himself over to the pursuit of youthful passions. He loved music and took delight in the company of songstresses. Often when he felt the urge to listen to the strings of a musical instrument or to enjoy the company of a singer, he would leave the hearths of his people in the Najd and make his way to Yathrib and in particular to the Jewish community which was widely known for its song and music.

While in Yathrib, Nuaym was known to spend generously and he in turn would be lavishly entertained. In this way Nuaym came to develop strong links among the Jews of the city and in particular with the Banu Qurayzah.

At the time when God favored mankind by sending His Prophet(S.A.W) with the religion of guidance and truth and the valleys of Makkah glowed with the light of Islam, Nuaym ibn Masud was still given over to the pursuit of sensual satisfaction. He stopped firmly opposed to the religion partly out of fear that he would be obliged to change and give up his pursuit of pleasure. And it was not long before he found himself being drawn into joining the fierce opposition to Islam and waging war against the Prophet(S.A.W) and his companions.

The moment of truth for Nuaym came during the great siege of Madinah which took place in the fifth year of the Prophet’s stay in the city. We need to go back a little to pick up the threads of the story.

Two years before the siege, the Prophet(S.A.W) was compelled to banish a group of Jews belonging to the tribe of Banu an-Nadir from Madinah because of their collaboration with the Quraysh enemy. The Banu Nadir migrated to the north and settled in Khaybar and other oases along the trade route to Syria. They at once began to incite the tribes both near and far against the Muslims. Caravans going to Madinah were harassed partly to put economic pressure on the city.

But this was not enough. Leaders of the Banu an-Nadir got together and decided to form a mighty alliance or confederacy of as many tribes as possible to wage war on the Prophet(S.A.W), and to put an end once and for all to his mission. The Nadirites went to the Quraysh in Makkah and urged them to continue the fight against the Muslims. They made a pact with the Quraysh to attack Madinah at a specified time.

After Makkah, the Nadirite leaders set out northwards on a journey of some one thousand kilometers to meet the Ghatafan. They promised the Ghatafan the entire annual date harvest of Khaybar for waging war against Islam and its Prophet. They informed the Ghatafan of the pact they had concluded with the Quraysh and persuaded them to make a similar agreement.

Other tribes were also persuaded to join the mighty alliance. From the north came the Banu Asad and the Fazar. From the south the Ahabish, allies of the Quraysh, the Banu Sulaym and others. At the appointed time, the Quraysh set out from Makkah in large numbers on cavalry and on foot under the Leadership of Abu Sufyan ibn Harb. The Ghatafan too set out from Najd in large numbers under the leadership of Ubaynah ibn Hisn. In the vanguard of the Ghatafan army was Nuaym ibn Masud.

News of the impending attack on Madinah reached the Prophet(S.A.W) while he was half-way on a long expedition to Dumat al-Jandal on the Syrian border some fifteen days journey from Madinah. The tribe at Dumat al-Jandal was molesting caravans bound for Madinah and their action was probably prompted by the Banu an-Nadir to entice the Prophet(S.A.W) away from Madinah. With the Prophet(S.A.W) away, they reasoned, it would be easier for the combined tribal forces from the north and the south to attack Madinah and deal a mortal blow to the Muslim community with the help of disaffected persons from within the city itself.

The Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, hurried back to Madinah and conferred with the Muslims. The forces of the Ahzab or the confederate enemy tribes amounted to over ten thousand men while the Muslims fighting were just three thousand men. It was unanimously decided to defend the city from within and to prepare for a siege rather than fight in the open. The Muslims were in dire straits.

“When they came upon you from above and from below you, and when eyes grew wild and hearts reached to the throats. and you were imagining vain thoughts concerning God. Then were the believers sorely tried and shaken with a mighty shock.” (The Quran, Surah al-Ahzab, 33:1O)

To protect the city, the Muslims decided to dig a ditch or khandaq. It is said that the ditch was about three and a half miles long and some ten yards wide and five yards deep. The three thousand Muslims were divided into groups of ten and each group was given a fixed number of cubits to dig. The digging of the ditch took several weeks to complete.

The ditch was just completed when the mighty enemy forces from the north and the south converged on Madinah. While they were within a short distance from the city the Nadirite conspirators approached their fellow Jews of the Banu Quraizah who lived in Madinah and tried to persuade them to join the war against the Prophet(S.A.W) by helping the two armies approaching from Makkah and the north.

The response of the Qurayzah Jews to the Nadirite leaders was: “You have indeed called us to participate in something which we like and desire to have accomplished. But you know there is a treaty between us and Muhammad binding us to keep the peace with him so long as we live secure and content in Madinah. You do realize that our pact with him is still valid. We are afraid that if Muhammad is victorious in this war he would then punish us severely and that he would expel us from Madinah as a result of our treachery towards him.”

The Nadirite leaders however continued to pressurize the Banu Qurayzah to renege on their treaty. Treachery to Muhammad, they affirmed, was a good and necessary act. They assured the Banu Qurayzah that there was no doubt this time that the Muslims would be completely routed and Muhammad(S.A.W) would be finished once and for all.

The approach of the two mighty armies strengthened the resolve of the Banu Qurayzah to disavow their treaty with Muhammad. They tore up the pact and declared their support for the confederates. The news fell on the Muslims ears with the force of a thunderbolt.

The confederate armies were now pressing against Madinah. They effectively cut off the city and prevented food and provisions and any form of outside help or reinforcement from reaching the inhabitants of the city. After the terrible exhaustions of the past months the Prophet(S.A.W) now felt as if they had fallen between the jaws of the enemy. The Quraysh and the Ghatafan were besieging the city from without.

The Banu Qurayzah were laying in wait behind the Muslims, ready to pounce from within the city. Added to this. the hypocrites of Madinah, those who had openly professed Islam but remained secretly opposed to the Prophet(S.A.W) and his mission, began to come out openly and cast doubt and ridicule on the Prophet.

“Muhammad promised us.” they said, “that we would gain possession of the treasures of Chosroes and Caesar and here we are today with not a single one of us being able to guarantee that he could go to the toilet safely to relieve himself!”

Thereafter, group after group of the inhabitants of Madinah began to disassociate themselves from the Prophet(S.A.W) expressing fear for their women and children and for their homes should the Banu Qurayzah attack once the fighting began.

The enemy forces though vastly superior in numbers were confounded by the enormous ditch. They had never seen or heard of such a military stratagem among the Arabs. Nonetheless they tightened their siege of the city. At the same time they attempted to breach the ditch at some narrow points but were repulsed by the vigilant Muslims. So hard-pressed were the Muslims that the Prophet Muhammad(S.A.W) and his companions once did not even have time for Salat and the Zuhr, Asr, Maghrib and Isha prayers had to be performed during the night.

As the siege wore on and the situation became more critical for the Muslims. Muhammad(S.A.W) turned fervently to his Lord for succour and support.

“O Allah,” he prayed, “I beseech you to grant Your promise of victory. O Allah I beseech You to grant your promise of victory.”

On that night, as the Prophet(S.A.W) prayed, Nuaym lay tossing in his bivouac. He could not sleep. He kept gazing at the stars in the vast firmament above. He thought hard and long and suddenly he found himself exclaiming and asking: “Woe to you, Nuaym! What is it really that has brought you from those far off places in Najd to fight this man and those with him? Certainly you are not fighting him for the triumph of right or for the protection of some honor violated.

Really you have only come here to fight for some unknown reason. Is it reasonable that someone with a mind such as yours should fight and kill or be killed for no cause whatsoever? Woe to you, Nuaym. What is it that has caused you to draw your sword against this righteous man who exhorts his followers to justice, good deeds and helping relatives? And what is it that has driven you to sink your spear into the bodies of his followers who follow the message of guidance and truth that he brought?”

Nuaym thus struggled with his conscience and debated with himself. Then he came to a decision. Suddenly he stood upright, determined. The doubts were gone. Under the cover of darkness, he slipped away from the camp of his tribe and made his way to the Prophet of God, peace and blessings of Allah be on him.

When the Prophet beheld him, standing erect in his presence, he exclaimed, “Nuaym ibn Masud?” “Yes, O Messenger of God,” declared Nuaym. “What has brought you here at this hour?”

“I came”, said Nuaym, “to declare that there is no god but Allah and that you are the servant of God and His Messenger and that the message you have brought is

He went on: “I have declared my submission to God, O Messenger of God, but my people do not know of my submission. Command me therefore to do whatever you desire.”

“You are only one person among us,” observed the Prophet(S.A.W). “So go to your people and act as if you have nothing to do with us for indeed war is treachery.”

“Yes, O Messenger of God,” replied Nuaym. And if God wills, you shall witness what pleases you.” Without losing any time, Nuaym went to the Banu Qurayzah. He was, as was mentioned earlier, a close friend of the tribe. “O Bani Qurayzah,” he said. “You have known my love for you and my sincerity in advising you.”

“Yes ,” they agreed, “but what are you suspicious of so far as we are concerned?” Nuaym continued: “The Quraysh and the Ghatafan have their own interests in this war which are different from your interests.” “How so?” they queried.

“This is your city,” Nuaym asserted. “You have your wealth, your children and your womenfolk here and it is not in your power to flee and take refuge in another city. On the other hand, the Quraysh and the Ghatafan have their land, their wealth, their children and their womenfolk away from this city.

They came to fight Muhammad(S.A.W) They urged you to break the treaty you had with him and to help them against him. So you responded positively to them. If they were to be victorious in their encounter with him, they would reap the booty. But if they fail to subdue him, they would return to their country safe and sound and they would leave you to him and he would be in a position to exact the most bitter revenge on you. You know very well that you would have no power to confront him.”

“You are right,” they said. “But what suggestion do you have?” “My opinion,” Nuaym suggested, “is that you should not join forces with them until you take a group of their prominent men as hostages. In that way you could carry on the fight against Muhammad(S.A.W) either till victory or till the last of your men or theirs perish. (They would not be able to leave you in the lurch).” “You have advised well,” they responded and agreed to take up his suggestion.

Nuaym then left and went to Abu Sufyan ibn Harb, the Quraysh leader and spoke to him and other Quraysh leaders. “O Quraysh,” said Nuaym, “You know my affection for you and my enmity towards Muhammad. I have heard some news and I thought it my duty to disclose it to you but you should keep it confidential and do not attribute it to me”

“You must inform us of this matter,” insisted the Quraysh.

Nuaym continued: “The Banu Qurayzah now regret that they have agreed to participate in the hostilities against Muhammad. They fear that you would turn back and abandon them to him. So they have sent a message to Muhammad saying: ‘We are sorry for what we have done and we are determined to return to the treaty and a state of peace with you. Would it please you then if we take several Quraysh and Ghatafan nobles and surrender them to you? We will then join you in fighting them – the Quraysh and the Ghatafan – until you finish them off.’

The Prophet(S.A.W) has sent back a reply to them saying he agrees. If therefore the Jews send a delegation to you demanding hostages from among your men do not hand over a single person to them. And do not mention a word of what I said to you.”

“What a good ally you are. May you be rewarded well ,” said Abu Sufyan gratefully.

Nuaym then went to his own people the Ghatafan, and spoke to them in a similar vein. He gave them the same warning against expected treachery from the Banu Qurayzah.

Abu Sufyan wanted to test the Banu Qurayzah so he sent his son to them. “My father sends greetings of peace to you,” began Abu Sufyan’s son. “He says that our siege of Muhammad and his companions has been a protracted affair and we have become weary…We are now determined to fight Muhammad and finish him off. My father has sent me to you to ask you to join battle with Muhammad tomorrow.”

“But tomorrow is Saturday,” said the Jews of Banu Qurayzah, “and we do not work at all on Saturdays. Moreover, we would not fight with you until you hand over to us seventy of your nobles and nobles from the Ghatafan as hostages. We fear that if the fighting becomes too intense for you would hasten back home and leave us alone to Muhammad. You know that we have no power to resist him…”

When Abu Sufyan’s son returned to his people and told them what he had heard from the Banu Qurayzah, they shouted in unison!

“Damned be the sons of monkeys and swine! By God, if they were to demand from us a single sheep as a hostage, we would not give them”.

And so it was that Nuaym was successful in causing disharmony among the confederates and splitting their ranks.

While the mighty alliance was in this state of disarray, God sent down on the Quraysh and their allies a fierce and bitterly cold wind which swept their tents and their vessels away, extinguished their fires, buffeted their faces and cast sand in their eyes. In this terrible state of confusion the allies fled under cover of darkness.

That very night the Prophet(S.A.W) had sent one his companions, Hudayfah ibn al-Yaman, to get information on the enemy’s morale and intentions. He brought back the news that on the advice and initiative of Abu Sufyan, the enemy had turned on their heels and fled… The news quickly spread through the Muslims ranks and they shouted in joy and relief!

La ilaha ilia Allahu wahdah Sadaqa wadah

Wa nasara abdah

Wa a azza jundah

Wa hazama-l ahzaba wahdah. There is no god but Allah alone To His promise He has been true His servant He has helped

His forces He has strengthened

And Alone the confederates He has destroyed.

The Prophet, peace be upon him, praised and gave thanks to his Lord for His deliverance from the threat posed by the mighty alliance. Nuaym, as a result of his subtle but major role in the blasting of the alliance, gained the confidence of the Prophet(S.A.W) who entrusted him thereafter with many a difficult task. He became the standard-bearer of the Prophet(S.A.W) on several occasions.

Three years after the Battle of the Ditch, on the day the Muslims marched victoriously into Makkah, Abu Sufyan ibn Harb stood surveying the Muslim armies. He beheld

a man carrying the Ghatafan flag and asked: “Who is this?” “Nuaym ibn Masud,” came the reply.

“He did a terrible thing to us at al-Khandaq,” Abu Sufyan confessed. “By God, he was certainly one of the fiercest enemies of Muhammad(S.A.W) and here he is now carrying his people’s flag in the ranks of Muhammad(S.A.W) and coming to wage war on us under his leadership.”

Through the grace of God and the magnanimity of the noble Prophet, Abu Sufyan himself was soon to join the same ranks.

Musab Ibn Umayr

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Musab Ibn Umayr

Musab ibn Umayr was born and grew up in the lap of affluence and luxury. His rich parents lavished a great deal of care and attention on him. He wore the most expensive clothes and the most stylish shoes of his time. Yemeni shoes were then considered to be very elegant and it was his privilege to have the very best of these.

As a youth he was admired by the Quraysh not only for his good looks and style but for his intelligence. His elegant bearing and keen mind endeared him to the Makkan nobility among whom he moved with ease. Although still young, he had the privilege of attending Quraysh meetings and gatherings. He was thus in a position to know the issues which concerned the Makkans and what their attitudes and strategies were.

Among Makkans there was a sudden outburst of excitement and concern as Muhammad, known as al- Amin (the Trustworthy), emerged saying that God had sent him as a bearer of good tidings and as a warner. He warned the Quraysh of terrible chastisement if they did not turn to the worship and obedience of God and he spoke of Divine rewards for the righteous. The whole of Makkah buzzed with talk of these claims. The vulnerable Quraysh leaders thought of ways of silencing Muhammad. When ridicule and persuasion did not work, they embarked on a campaign of harassment and persecution.

Musab learnt that Muhammad(S.A.W) and those who believed in his message were gathering in a house near the hill of as-Safa to evade Quraysh harassment. This was the house of al-Arqam. To satisfy his curiosity, Musab proceeded to the house undeterred by the knowledge of Quraysh hostility. There he met the Prophet(S.A.W) teaching his small band of companions, reciting the verses of the Quran to them and performing Salat with them in submission to God, the Great, the Most High.

The Prophet welcomed him, and with his noble hand tenderly touched Musab’s heart as it throbbed with excitement. A deep feeling of tranquility came over him.

Musab was totally overwhelmed by what he had seen and heard. The words of the Quran had made a deep and immediate impression on him.

In this first meeting with the Prophet(S.A.W) the young and decisive Musab declared his acceptance of Islam. It was a historic moment. The keen mind of Musab, his tenacious will and determination, his eloquence and his beautiful character were now in the service of Islam and would help change the course of men’s destinies and of history.

On accepting Islam Musab had one major concern his mother. Her name was Khunnas bint Malik. She was a woman of extraordinary power. She had a dominant personality and could easily arouse fear and terror. When Musab became a Muslim, the only power on earth he might have feared was his mother. All the powerful nobles of Makkah and their attachment to pagan customs and traditions were of little consequence to him. Having his mother as an opponent, however, could not be taken lightly.

Musab thought quickly. He decided that he should conceal his acceptance of Islam until such time as a solution should come from God. He continued to frequent the House of al-Arqam and sit in the company of the Prophet(S.A.W). He felt serene in his new faith and by keeping all indications of his acceptance of Islam away from her, he managed to stave off his mother’s wrath, but not for long.

It was difficult during those days to keep anything secret in Makkah for long. The eyes and ears of the Quraysh were on every road. Behind every footstep imprinted in the soft and burning sand was a Quraysh informer. Before long, Musab was seen as he quietly entered the House of al-Arqam, by someone called Uthman ibn Talhah.

At another time, Uthman saw Musab praying in the same manner as Muhammad prayed. The conclusion was obvious.

As winds in a storm, the devastating news of Musab’s acceptance of Islam spread among the Quraysh and eventually reached his mother.

Musab stood before his mother, his clan and the Quraysh nobility who had all gathered to find out what he had done and what he had to say for himself.

With a certain humility and calm confidence, Musab acknowledged that he had become a Muslim and no doubt he explained his reasons for so doing. He then recited some verses of the Quran – verses which had cleansed the hearts of the believers and brought them back to the natural religion of God. Though only few in number, their hearts were now filled with wisdom, honor, justice and courage.

As Musab’s mother listened to her son on whom she had lavished so much care and affection, she became increasingly incensed. She felt like silencing him with one terrible blow. But the hand which shot out like an arrow staggered and faltered before the light which radiated from Musab’s serene face. Perhaps, it was her mother’s love which restrained her from actually beating him, but still she felt she had to do something to avenge the gods which her son had forsaken.

The solution she decided upon was far worse for Musab than a few blows could ever have been. She had Musab taken to a far corner of the house. There he was firmly bound and tethered. He had become a prisoner in his own home.

For a long time, Musab remained tied and confined under the watchful eyes of guards whom his mother had placed over him to prevent him from any further contact with Muhammad(S.A.W) and his faith. Despite his ordeal, Musab did not waver. He must have had news of how other Muslims were being harassed and tortured by the idolaters. For him, as for many other Muslims, life in Makkah was becoming more and more intolerable.

Eventually he heard that a group of Muslims were preparing secretly to migrate to Abyssinia to seek refuge and relief. His immediate thoughts were how to escape from his prison and join them. At the first opportunity, when his mother and his warders were off-guard, he managed to slip away quietly. Then with utmost haste he joined the other refugees and before long they sailed together across the Red Sea to Africa.

Although the Muslims enjoyed peace and security in the land of the Negus, they longed to be in Makkah in the company of the noble Prophet(S.A.W). So when a report reached Abyssinia that the conditions of the Muslims in Makkah had improved, Musab was among the first to return to Makkah. The report was in fact false and Musab once again left for Abyssinia.

Whether he was in Makkah or Abyssinia, Musab remained strong in his new faith and his main concern was to make his life worthy of his Creator.

When Musab returned to Makkah again, his mother made a last attempt to gain control of him and threatened to have him tied up again and confined. Musab swore that if she were to do that, he would kill everyone who helped her. She knew very well that he would carry out this threat for she saw the iron determination he now had.

Separation was inevitable. When the moment came, it was sad for both mother and son but it revealed a strong Persistence in kufr on the part of the mother and an even greater persistence in iman on the part of the son. As she threw him out of her house and cut him off from all the material comforts she used to lavish on him, she said:

“Go to your own business. I am not prepared to be a mother to you.” Musab went up close to her and said:

“Mother, I advise you sincerely. I am concerned about you. Do testify that there is no god but Allah and that Muhammad is His servant and His Messenger.”

“I swear by the shooting stars, I shall not enter your religion even if my opinion is ridiculed and my mind becomes impotent,” she insisted.

Musab thus left her home and the luxury and comforts he used to enjoy. The elegant, well-dressed youth would henceforth be seen only in the coursest of attire. He now had more important concerns. He was determined to use his talents and energies in acquiring knowledge and in serving God and His Prophet(S.A.W).

One day, several years later, Musab came upon a gathering of Muslims sitting around the Prophet, may God bless him and grant him peace. They bowed their heads and lowered their gaze when they saw Musab, and some were even moved to tears. This was because his jalbab was old and in tatters and they were immediately taken back to the days before his acceptance of Islam when he was a model of sartorial elegance.

The Prophet looked at Musab, smiled gracefully and said:

“I have seen this Musab with his parents in Makkah. They lavished care and attention on him and gave him all comforts. There was no Quraysh youth like him. Then he left all that seeking the pleasure of God and devoting himself to the service of His Prophet.” The Prophet(S.A.W) then went on to say:

“There will come a time when God will grant you victory over Persia and Byzantium. You would have one dress in the morning and another in the evening and you would eat out of one dish in the morning and another in the evening.”

In other words, the Prophet predicted that the Muslims would become rich and powerful and that they would have material goods in plenty. The companions sitting around asked the Prophet:

“O Messenger of Allah, are we in a better situation in these times or would we be better off then?” He replied:

“You are rather better off now than you would be then. If you knew of the world what I know you would certainly not be so much concerned with it.”

On another occasion, the Prophet(S.A.W) talked in a similar vein to his companions and asked them how they would be if they could have one suit of clothes in the morning and another in the evening and even have enough material to put curtains in their houses just as the Ka’aba was fully covered.

The companions replied that they would then be in a better situation because they would then have sufficient sustenance and would be free for ibadah (worship). The Prophet however told them that they were indeed better off as they were.

After about ten years of inviting people to Islam, most of Makkah still remained hostile. The noble Prophet(S.A.W) then went to Taif seeking new adherents to the faith. He was repulsed and chased out of the city. The future of Islam looked bleak.

It was just after this that the Prophet(S.A.W) chose Musab to be his “ambassador” to Yathrib to teach a small group of believers who had come to pledge allegiance to Islam and prepare Madinah for the day of the great Hijrah.

Musab was chosen above companions who were older than he or were more closely related to the Prophet(S.A.W) or who appeared to possess greater prestige. No doubt Musab was chosen for this task because of his noble character, his fine manners and his sharp intellect.

His knowledge of the Quran and his ability to recite it beautifully and movingly was also an important consideration. Musab understood his mission well. He knew that he was on a sacred mission. to invite people to God and the straight path of Islam and to prepare what was to be the territorial base for the young and struggling Muslim community.

He entered Madinah as a guest of Sad ibn Zurarah of the Khazraj tribe. Together they went to people, to their homes and their gatherings, telling them about the Prophet(S.A.W), explaining Islam to them and reciting the Quran. Through the grace of God, many accepted Islam. This was especially pleasing to Musab but profoundly alarming to many leaders of Yathribite society.

Once Musab and Sad were sitting near a well in an orchard of the Zafar clan. With them were a number of new Muslims and others who were interested in Islam. A powerful notable of the city, Usayd ibn Khudayr, came up brandishing a spear. He was livid with rage. Sad ibn Zararah saw him and told Musab:

“This is a chieftain of his people. May God place truth in his heart.” “If he sits down, I will speak to him,” replied Musab, displaying all the calm and tact of a great daiy.

The angry Usayd shouted abuse and threatened Musab and his host. “Why have you both come to us to corrupt the weak among us? Keep away from us if you want to stay alive.” Musab smiled a warm and friendly smile and said to Usayd: “Won’t you sit down and listen? If you are pleased and satisfied with our mission accept it and if you dislike it we would stop telling you what you dislike and leave.”

“That’s reasonable,” said Usayd and, sticking his spear in the ground, sat down. Musab was not compelling him to do anything. He was not denouncing him. He was merely inviting him to listen. If he was satisfied, well and good. If not, then Musab would leave his district and his clan without any fuss and go to another district.

Musab began telling him about Islam and recited the Quran to him. Even before Usayd spoke, it was clear from his face, now radiant and expectant, that faith had entered his heart. He said:

“How beautiful are these words and how true! What does a person do if he wants to enter this religion?”

“Have a bath, purify yourself and your clothes. Then utter the testimony of Truth (Shahadah), and perform Salat. Usayd left the gathering and was absent for only a short while. He returned and testified that there is no god but Allah and that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah. He then prayed two rakats and said:

“After me, there is a man who if he follows you, everyone of his people will follow him. I shall send him to you now. He is ‘Sad ibn Muadh.”

Sad ibn Muadh came and listened to Musab. He was convinced and satisfied and declared his submission to God. He was followed by another important Yathribite, Sad ibn Ubadah. Before long, the people of Yathrib were all in a flurry, asking one another.

“If Usayd ibn Khudayr, Sad ibn Muadh and Sad ibn Ubadah have accepted the new religion, how can we not follow? Let’s go to Musab and believe with him. They say that truth emanates from his lips.”

The first ambassador of the Prophet, peace be on him, was thus supremely successful. The Prophet had chosen well. Men and women, the young and the old, the powerful and the weak accepted Islam at his hands. The course of Yathribite history had been changed forever. The way was being prepared for the great Hijrah. Yathrib was soon to become the center and the base for the Islamic state.

Less than a year after his arrival in Yathrib, Musab returned to Makkah. It was again in the season of pilgrimage. With him was a group of seventy-five Muslims from Madinah. Again at Aqabah, near Mina, they met the Prophet(S.A.W). There they solemnly undertook to defend the Prophet(S.A.W) at all cost. Should they remain firm in their faith, their reward, said the Prophet(S.A.W), would be nothing less than Paradise. This second bayah or pledge which the Muslims of Yathrib made came to be called the Pledge of War.

From then on events moved swiftly. Shortly after the Pledge, the Prophet(S.A.W) directed his persecuted followers to migrate to Yathrib where the new Muslims or Ansar (Helpers) had shown their willingness to give asylum and extend their protection to the afflicted Muslims. The first of the Prophet’s(S.A.W) companions to arrive in Madinah were Musab ibn Umayr and the blind Abdullah ibn Umm Maktum. Abdullah also recited the Quran beautifully and according to one of the Ansar, both Musab and Abdullah recited the Quran for the people of Yathrib.

Musab continued to play a major role in the building of the new community. The next momentous situation in which we meet him was during the great Battle of Badr. After the battle was over, the Quraysh prisoners of war were brought to the Prophet who assigned them to the custody of individual Muslims. “Treat them well,” he instructed.

Among the prisoners was Abu Aziz ibn Umayr, the brother of Musab. Abu Aziz related what happened: “I was among a group of Ansar…Whenever they had lunch or dinner they would give me bread and dates to eat in obedience to the Prophet’s(S.A.W) instructions to them to treat us well.

“My brother, Musab ibn Umayr, passed by me and said to the man from the Ansar who was holding me prisoner:

‘Tie him firmly… His mother is a woman of great wealth and maybe she would ransom him for you.'” Abu Aziz could not believe his ears. Astonished, he turned to Musab and asked: “My brother, is this your instruction concerning me?”

“He is my brother, not you,” replied Musab thus affirming that in the battle between iman and kufr, the bonds of faith were stronger than the ties of kinship.

At the Battle of Uhud, the Prophet(S.A.W) called upon Musab, now well-known as Musab al-Khayr (the Good), to carry the Muslim standard. At the beginning of the battle, the Muslims seemed to be gaining the upper hand. A group of Muslims then went against the orders of the Prophet(S.A.W) and deserted their positions. The mushrikin forces rallied again and launched a counterattack. Their main objective, as they cut through the Muslim forces, was to get to the noble Prophet(S.A.W).

Musab realized the great danger facing the Prophet(S.A.W). He raised the standard high and shouted the takbir. With the standard in one hand and his sword in the other, he plunged into the Quraysh forces. The odds were against him. A Quraysh horseman moved in close and severed his right hand. Musab was heard to repeat the words:

“Muhammad is only a Messenger. Messengers have passed away before him,” showing that however great his attachment was to the Prophet himself, his struggle above all was for the sake of God and for making His word supreme. His left hand was then severed also and as he held the standard between the stumps of his arms, to console himself he repeated: “Muhammad is only a Messenger of God. Messengers have passed away before him.” Musab was then hit by a spear. He fell and the standard fell. The words he repeated, every time he was struck were later revealed to the Prophet(S.A.W) and completed, and became part of the Quran.

After the battle, the Prophet(S.A.W) and his companions went through the battlefield, bidding farewell to the martyrs. When they came to Musab’s body, tears flowed. Khabbah related that they could not find any cloth with which to shroud Musab’s body, except his own garment. When they covered his head with it, his legs showed and when his legs were covered, his head was exposed and the Prophet(S.A.W) instructed:

“Place the garment over his head and cover his feet and legs with the leaves of the idhkhir (rue) plant.”

The Prophet(S.A.W) felt deep pain and sorrow at the number of his companions who were killed at the Battle of Uhud. These included his uncle Hamzah whose body was horribly mutilated. But it was over the body of Musab that the Prophet(S.A.W) stood, with great emotion. He remembered Musab as he first saw him in Makkah, stylish and elegant, and then looked at the short burdah which was now the only garment he possessed and he recited the verse of the Quran:

“Among the believers are men who have been true to what they have pledged to God.”

The Prophet then cast his tender eyes over the battlefield on which lay the dead companions of Musab and said: “The Messenger of God testifies that you are martyrs in the sight of God on the day of Qiyamah.”

Then turning to the living companions around him he said: “O People! Visit them, send peace on them for, by Him in whose hand is my soul, any Muslim who sends peace on them until the day of Qiyamah, they would return the salutation of peace.”

As-salaamu alayka yaa Musab…

As-salaamu alaykum, ma’shar ash-shudhadaa. As-salaamu alaykum wa rahmatullah wa barakatuhu. Peace be on you, O Musab…

Peace be on you all, O martyrs. .

Peace be on you and the mercy and blessings of God.

From Alim® Online

Muadh Ibn Jabal

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Muadh Ibn Jabal

Muadh ibn Jabal was a young man growing up in Yathrib as the light of guidance and truth began to spread over the Arabian peninsula. He was a handsome and Imposing character with black eyes and curly hair and immediately impressed whoever he met. He was already distinguished for the sharpness of his intelligence among young men of his own age.

The young Muadh became a Muslim at the hands of Musab ibn Umayr, the da’iy (missionary) whom the Prophet had sent to Yathrib before the hijrah. Muadh was among the seventy-two Yathribites who journeyed to Makkah, one year before the hijrah, and met the Prophet(S.A.W) at his house and later again in the valley of Mina, outside Makkah, at Aqabah.

Here the famous second Aqabah Pledge was made at which the new Muslims of Yathrib, including some women, vowed to support and defend the Prophet(S.A.W) at any cost. Muadh was among those who enthusiastically clasped the hands of the blessed Prophet(S.A.W) then and pledged allegiance to him.

As soon as Muadh returned to Madinah from Makkah, he and a few others of his age formed a group to remove and destroy idols from the houses of the mushrikeen in Yathrib. One of the effects of this campaign was that a prominent man of the city, Amr ibn al-Jumuh, became a Muslim .

When the noble Prophet(S.A.W) reached Madinah, Muadh ibn Jabal stayed in his company as much as possible. He studied the Qur’an and the laws of Islam until he became one of the most well-versed of all the companions in the religion of Islam.

Wherever Muadh went, people would refer to him for legal judgements on matters over which they differed. This is not strange since he was brought up in the school of the Prophet(S.A.W) himself and learnt as much as he could from him. He was the best pupil of the best teacher. His knowledge bore the stamp of authenticity. The best certificate that he could have received came from the Prophet(S.A.W) himself when he said:

“The most knowledgeable of my ummah in matters of halal and haram is Muadh ibn Jabal.”

One of the greatest of Muadh’s contributions to the ummah of Muhammad(S.A.W) was that he was one of the group of six who collected the Qur’an during the lifetime of the Prophet, peace be upon him. Whenever a group of companions met and Muadh was among them, they would look at him with awe and respect on account of his knowledge. The Prophet(S.A.W) and his two Khalifahs after him placed this unique gift and power in the service of Islam.

After the liberation of Makkah, the Quraysh became Muslims en masse. The Prophet(S.A.W) immediately saw the need of the new Muslims for teachers to instruct them in the fundamentals of Islam and to make them truly understand the spirit and letter of its laws. He appointed Attab ibn Usay as his deputy in Makkah and he asked Muadh ibn Jabal to stay with him and teach people the Qur’an and instruct them in the religion.

Sometime after the Prophet had returned to Madinah, messengers of the kings of Yemen came to him announcing that they and the people of Yemen had become Muslims. They requested that some teachers should be with them to teach Islam to the people. For this task the Prophet(S.A.W) commissioned a group of competent du’at (missionaries) and made Muadh ibn Jabal their amir.

He then put the following question to Muadh:

“According to what will you judge?”

“According to the Book of God,” replied Muadh.

“And if you find nothing therein?”

“According to the Sunnah of the Prophet of God.”

“And if you find nothing therein?”

“Then I will exert myself (exercise ijtehad) to form own judgement.” The Prophet was pleased with this reply and said:

“Praise be to God Who has guided the messenger of the Prophet to that which pleases the Prophet.”

The Prophet(S.A.W) personally bade farewell to this mission of guidance and light and walked for some distance alongside Muadh as he rode out of the city. Finally he said to him:

“O Muadh, perhaps you shall not meet me again after this year. Perhaps when you return you shall see only my mosque and my grave.”

Muadh wept. Those with him wept too. A feeling of sadness and desolation overtook him as he parted from his beloved Prophet, peace and blessings of God be on him.

The Prophet’s premonition was correct. The eyes of Muadh never beheld the Prophet(S.A.W) after that moment. The Prophet(S.A.W) died before Muadh returned from the Yemen. There is no doubt that Muadh wept when he returned to Madinah and found there was no longer the blessed company of the Prophet(S.A.W).

During the caliphate of Umar, Muadh was sent to the Banu Kilab to apportion their stipends and to distribute the sadaqah of their richer folk among the poor. When he had done his duty, he returned to his wife with his saddle blanket around his neck, empty handed, and she asked him:

“Where are the gifts which commissioners return with for their families?” “I had an alert Supervisor who was checking over me,” he replied.

“You were a trusted person with the messenger of God and with Abu Bakr. Then Umar came and he sent a supervisor with you to check on you!” she exclaimed.

She went on to talk about this to the women of Umar’s household and complained to them about it. The complaint eventually reached Umar, so he summoned Muadh and said:

“Did I send a supervisor with you to check on you?”

“No, Amir al-Mu’mineen,” he said, “But that was the only reason I could find to give her.” Umar laughed and then gave him a gift, saying,

“I hope this pleases you.”

Also during the caliphate of Umar, the governor of Syria, Yazid ibn Abi Sufyan sent a message saying:

“O Amir al-Mu’mineen! The people of Syria are many. They fill the towns. They need people to teach them the Qur’an and instruct them in the religion.”

Umar thereupon summoned five persons who had collected the Qur’an in the lifetime of the Prophet, peace be upon him. They were Muadh ibn Jabal, ‘Ubadah ibn asSamit, Abu Ayyub al-Ansari, Ubayy ibn Ka’b and Abu adDardaa. He said to them:

“Your brothers in Syria have asked me to help them by sending those who can teach them the Qur’an and instruct them in the religion. Please appoint three among you for this task and may God bless you. I can select three of you myself if you do not want to put the matter to the vote.”

“Why should we vote?” they asked. “Abu Ayyub is quite old and Ubayy is a sick man. That leaves three of us.”

“All three of you go to Homs first of all. If you are satisfied with the condition of the people there, one of you should stay there, another should go to Damascus and the other to Palestine.”

So it was that ‘Ubadah ibn as-Samit was left at Homs, Abu ad-Dardaa went to Damascus and Muadh went to Palestine. There Muadh fell ill with an infectious disease. As he was near to death, he turned in the direction of the Ka’bah and repeated this refrain:

“Welcome Death, Welcome. A visitor has come after a long absence . . .” And looking up to heaven, he said:

“O Lord, You know that I did not desire the world and to prolong my stay in it . . . O Lord, accept my soul with goodness as you would accept a believing soul . . .”

He then passed away, far from his family and his clan, a da’iy in the service of God and a muhajer in His path.

From: Companions of The Prophet”, Vol.1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.

Muhammad Ibn Maslamah

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Muhammad Ibn Maslamah

Black, tall and sturdy, Muhammad ibn Maslamah towered above his contemporaries. He was a giant among the companions of the Prophet, a giant in body and a giant in deeds. Significantly he was called Muhammad even before he became a Muslim. It would seem that his name was itself a pointer to the fact that he was among the first of the Yathribites to become a Muslim and to follow the teachings of the great Prophet.

(The name Muhammad was practically unknown at the time but since the Prophet encouraged Muslims to name themselves after him, it has become one of the most widely used names in the world.)

Muhammad ibn Maslamah was a halif or an ally of the Aws tribe in Madinah indicating that he himself was not an Arab. He became a Muslim at the hands of Musab ibn Umayr, the first missionary sent out by the Prophet from Makkah to Madinah. He accepted Islam even before men like Usayd ibn Hudayr and Sad ibn Muadh who were influential men in the city.

When the Prophet, peace be on him, came to Madinah, he adopted the unique method of strengthening the bonds of brotherhood between the Muhajirin and the Ansar. He paired off each Muhajir with one of the Ansar. This arrangement also helped to relieve the immediate needs of the Muhajirin for shelter and food and created an integrated community of believers.

The Prophet(S.A.W) was a keen observer of character and temperament and was concerned to join in brotherhood persons of similar attitudes and tastes. He joined in brotherhood Muhammad ibn Maslamah and Abu Ubaydah ibn al-Jarrah. Like Abu Ubaydah, Muhammad ibn Maslamah was quiet and pensive and had a strong sense of trust and devotion. He was also brave and resolute in action. He was a distinguished horseman who performed feats of heroism and sacrifice in the service of Islam.

Muhammad ibn Maslamah took part in all the military engagements of the Prophet(S.A.W) except the expedition to Tabuk. On that occasion, he and Ali were put in charge of an army which was left behind to protect Madinah. Later in life, he would often relate scenes of these battles to his ten children.

There are many instances in the life of Muhammad ibn Maslamah which showed what a dependable and trustworthy person he was. Before the start of hostilities at the Battle of Uhud, the Prophet and the Muslim force numbering some seven hundred persons spent a night in an open camp. He put fifty men under the command of Muhammad ibn Maslamah and entrusted him with the task of patrolling the camp the whole night.

During the battle itself, after the disastrous rout of the Muslims by the Quraysh during which about seventy Muslims lost their lives and many fled in every possible direction, a small band of the faithful bravely defended the Prophet(S.A.W) till the tide of battle turned. Muhammad ibn Maslamah was among them.

Muhammad ibn Maslamah was quick to respond to the call of action. He once stood listening to the Prophet(S.A.W) as he spoke to the Muslims about the designs of some of the Jewish leaders in the region. At the beginning of his stay in Madinah, the Prophet had concluded an agreement with the Jews of the city which said in part:

“The Jews who attach themselves to our commonwealth shall be protected from all insults and harassment. They shall have equal rights as our own people to our assistance…They shall join the Muslims in defending Madinah against all enemies…They shall not declare war nor enter in treaty or agreement against the Muslims.”

Jewish leaders had violated this agreement by encouraging the Quraysh and tribes around Madinah in their designs against the state. They were also bent on creating discord among the people of Madinah in order to weaken the influence of Islam.

After the resounding victory of the Muslims over the Quraysh at the Battle of Badr, one of the three main Jewish groups in Madinah, the Banu Qaynuqa was especially furious and issued a petulant challenge to the Prophet(S.A.W). They said:

“O Muhammad! You really think that we are like your people (the Quraysh)? Don’t be deceived. You confronted a people who have no knowledge of war and you took the chance to rout them. If you were to fight against us you would indeed know that we arc men.”

They thus spurned their agreement with the Prophet(S.A.W) and issued an open challenge to fight. The Qaynuqa however were goldsmiths who dominated the market in Madinah. They were depending on their allies, the Khazraj, to help them in their declared war. The Khazraj refused. The Prophet placed the Banu Qaynuqa’s quarters under a siege which lasted for fifteen nights. The fainthearted Qaynuqa finally decided to surrender and ask the Prophet(S.A.W) for a free passage out of Madinah.

The Prophet(S.A.W) allowed them to leave and the tribe – men, women and children – left unharmed. They had to leave behind them their arms and their goldsmith’s equipment. They settled down at Adhraat in Syria.

The departure of the Qaynuqa did not end Jewish feelings of animosity towards the Prophet(S.A.W) although the nonaggression agreement was still in force. One of those who was consumed with hatred against the Prophet(S.A.W) and the Muslims and who openly gave vent to his rage was Kab ibn al-Ashraf.

Kab’s father was in fact an Arab who had fled to Madinah after committing a crime. He became an ally of the Banu Nadir, another important Jewish group, and married a Jewish lady name Aqilah bint Abu-l Haqiq. She was Kab’s mother.

Kab was a tall and impressive looking person. He was a well-known poet and was one of the richest men among the Jews. He lived in a castle on the outskirts of Madinah where he had extensive palm groves. He was regarded as a Jewish leader of importance throughout the Hijaz. He provided means of support and sponsorship to many Jewish rabbis.

Kab was openly hostile to Islam. He lampooned the Prophet(S.A.W) besmirched in verse the reputation of Muslim women, and incited the tribes in and around Madinah against the Prophet (S.A.W) and Islam.

He was particularly distressed when he heard the news of the Muslim victory at Badr. When he saw the returning army with the Quraysh prisoners of war, he was bitter and furious. He took it upon himself then to make the long journey to Makkah to express his grief and to incite the Quraysh to take further revenge.

He also went to other areas, from tribe to tribe, urging people to take up arms against the Prophet(S.A.W). News of his activities reached the Prophet, peace be on him, who prayed: “O Lord, rid me of the son of Ashfar, however You wish.”

Kab had become a real danger to the state of peace and mutual trust which the Prophet(S.A.W) was struggling to achieve in Madinah.

Kab returned to Madinah and continued his verbal attacks on the Prophet(S.A.W) and his abuse of Muslim women. He refused, after warnings from the Prophet(S.A.W) to stop his dirty campaign and sinister intrigues. He was bent on fomenting a revolt against the Prophet(S.A.W) and the Muslims in Madinah.

By all these actions, Kab had openly declared war against the Prophet(S.A.W). He was dangerous and a public enemy to the nascent Muslim state. The Prophet(S.A.W) was quite exasperated with him and said to the Muslims: “Who will deal with Kab ibn al-Ashraf? He has offended God and His Apostle.”

“I shall deal with him for you, O Messenger of God(S.A.W),” volunteered Muhammad ibn Maslamah.

This, however, was no easy undertaking. Muhammad ibn Maslamah, according to one report, went home and stayed for three days without either eating or drinking, just thinking about what he had to do. The Prophet(S.A.W) heard of this, called him and asked him why he had not been eating or drinking. He replied: “O Messenger of God(S.A.W), I gave an undertaking to you but I do not know whether I can accomplish it or not.” “Your duty is only to try your utmost,” replied the Prophet(S.A.W).

Muhammad ibn Maslamah then went to some other companions of the Prophet(S.A.W) and told them what he had undertaken to do. They included Abu Nailah, a foster brother of Kab ibn al-Ahsraf. They agreed to help him and he devised a plan to accomplish the mission. They went back to the Prophet(S.A.W) to seek his approval since the plan involved enticing Kab from his fortress residence through some deception. The Prophet(S.A.W) gave his consent on the principle that war involved deceit.

Both Muhammad ibn Maslamah who was in fact a nephew of Kab by fosterage and Abu Nailah then went to Kab’s residence. Muhammad ibn Maslamah was the first to speak: “This man (meaning the Prophet, peace be on him) has asked us for sadaqah (charitable tax) and we cannot even find food to eat. He is oppressing us with his laws and prohibitions and I thought I could come to you to ask for a loan.”

“By God, I am much more dissatisfied with him,” confessed Kab. “We have followed him but we do not want to leave him until we see how this whole business will end. We would like you to lend us a wasaq or two of gold,” continued Muhammad ibn Maslamah.

“Isn’t it about time that you realize what falsehood you are tolerating from him? asked Kab as he promised to give them the loan. “However,” he said, “you must provide security (for the loan).”

“What security do you want?” they asked. “Give me your wives as security,” he suggested. “How can we give you our wives as security ,” they protested, “when you are the most handsome of Arabs?”

“Then give me your children as security,” Kab suggested. “How can we give you our children as security when any one of them would thereafter be ridiculed by being called a hostage for one or two wasaqs of gold. This would be a disgrace to us. But we could give you our (means of) protection (meaning weapons) since you know that we need them.”

Kab agreed to this suggestion which they had made to disabuse his mind of any notion that they had come armed. They promised to come back to him again to bring the weapons.

Meanwhile, Abu Nailah also came up to Kab and said: “Woe to you, Ibn Ashraf. I have come to you intending to mention something to you and you do not encourage me.” Kab asked him to go on and Abu Nailah said:

“The coming of this man to us has been a source of affliction to our Arab customs. With one shot he has severed our ways and left families hungry and in difficulties. We and our families are struggling.” Kab replied: “I, Ibn al-Ashraf, by God, I had told you, son of Salamah, that the matter would end up as I predicted.” Abu Nailah replied: “I wish you could sell us some food and we would

give you whatever form of security and trust required.

Be good to us. I have friends who share my views on this and I want to bring them to you so that you could sell them some food and deal well towards them. We will come to you and pledge our shields and weapons to you as security.” “There is loyalty and good faith in weapons,” agreed Kab.

With this they left promising to return and bring the required security for the loan. They went back to

the Prophet(S.A.W) and reported to him what had happened. That night, Muhammad ibn Maslamah, Abu Nailah, Abbad ibn Bishr, Al-Harith ibn Aws and Abu Abasah ibn Jabr all set off for Kabs house. The Prophet(S.A.W) went with them for a short distance and parted with the words:

“Go forth in the name of God.” And he prayed: “O Lord, help them.” The Prophet(S.A.W) returned home. It was a moonlit night in the month of Rabi al-Awwal in the third year of the hijrah.

Muhammad ibn Maslamah and the four with him reached Kab’s house. They called out to him. As he got out of bed, his wife held him and warned: “You are a man at war. People at war do not go down at such an hour.” “It is only my nephew Muhammad ibn Maslamah and my foster brother, Abu Nailah…” Kab came down with his sword drawn. He was heavily scented with the perfume of musk.

“I have not smelt such a pleasant scent as today,” greeted Muhammad ibn Maslamah. “Let me smell your head.” Kab agreed and as Muhammad bent over, he grasped Kab’s head firmly and called on the others to strike down the enemy of God.

(Details of this incident vary somewhat. Some reports state that it was Abu Nailah who gave the command to strike down Kab and this was done after Kab had emerged from his house and walked with them for some time. )

The elimination of Kab ibn al-Ashraf struck terror into the hearts of those, and there were many of them in Madinah, who plotted and intrigued against the Prophet(S.A.W). Such open hostility as Kab’s diminished for a time but certainly did not cease.

At the beginning of the fourth year of the hijrah, the Prophet(S.A.W) went to the Jewish tribe of Banu Nadir on the outskirts of Madinah to seek their help on a certain matter. While among them, he found out that they were planning to kill him then and there. He had to take decisive action. The Banu Nadir had gone too far. Straight away, the Prophet(S.A.W) went back to the center of the city.

He summoned Muhammad ibn Maslamah and sent him to inform the Banu Nadir that they had to leave Madinah within ten days because of their treacherous behavior and that any one of them seen after that in the city would forfeit his life.

One can just imagine Muhammad ibn Maslamah addressing the Banu Nadir. His towering stature and his loud and clear voice combined to let the Banu Nadir know that the Prophet(S.A.W) meant every word he said and that they had to stand the consequences of their treacherous acts. The fact that the Prophet(S.A.W) chose Muhammad ibn Maslamah for the task is a tribute to his loyalty, courage and firmness.

Further details of the expulsion of the Banu Nadir from Madinah do not concern us here: their plan to resist the Prophet(S.A.W) with outside help; the Prophet’s(S.A.W) siege of their district and their eventual surrender and evacuation mainly to Khaybar in the north. Two of the Banu Nadir though became MusIims – Yamin ibn Umayr and Abu Sad ibn Wahb. All this happened exactly one year after the elimination of Kab ibn al-Ashraf.

Both during the time of the Prophet(S.A.W) and after, Muhammad ibn Maslamah was known for carrying out any assignment he accepted exactly as he was ordered, neither doing more nor less than he was asked to do. It was these qualities which made Umar choose him as one of his ministers and as a trusted friend and guide.

When Amr ibn al-Aas requested reinforcements during his expedition to Egypt, Umar sent him four detachments of one thousand men each. Leading these detachments were Muhammad ibn Maslamah, az- Zubayr ibn aI-Awwam, Ubadah ibn as-Samit and al-Miqdad ibn al-Aswad. To Amr, Umar sent a message saying, “Let me remind you that I am sending Muhammad ibn Maslamah to you to help you distribute your wealth. Accommodate him and forgive any harshness of his towards you.”

Ibn Maslamah went to Amr in Fustat (near present-day Cairo).. He sat at his table but did not touch the food. Amr asked him: “Did Umar prevent you from tasting my food?” “No,” replied ibn Maslamah, “he did not prevent me from having your food but neither did he command me to eat of it.” He then placed a flat loaf of bread on the table and ate it with salt. Amr became upset and said:

“May God bring to an end the time in which we work for Umar ibn al-Khattab! I have witnessed a time when al-Khattab and his son Umar were wandering around wearing clothes which could not even cover them properly while Al-Aas ibn Wail (Amr’s father) sported brocade lined with gold…”

“As for your father and the father of Umar, they are in hell,” retorted Muhammad ibn Maslamah, because they did not accept Islam. “As for you, if Umar did not give you an appointment, you would have been pleased with what you got from their udders,” continued Ibn Maslamah obviously disabusing Amr’s mind of any ideas he might have of appearing superior because he was the governor of Egypt.

“Assemblies must be conducted as a form of trust,” said Amr in an attempt to diffuse the situation and Muhammad ibn Maslamah replied: “Oh yes, so long as Umar is alive.” He wanted to impress upon people the justice of Umar and the egalitarian teachings of Islam. Muhammad ibn Maslamah was a veritable scourge against all arrogant and haughty behavior.

On another occasion and at another end of the Muslim state under his caliphate, Umar heard that the famous Sad ibn Abi Waqqas was building a palace at Kufa. Umar sent Muhammad ibn Maslamah to deal with the situation. On reaching Kufa, Muhammad promptly burnt the palace down. One does not know whether people were more surprised by the instructions of Umar or by the humiliation of Sad ibn Abi Waqqas, the famed fighter, conqueror at Qadisiyyah, and the one praised by the Prophet himself for his sacrifices at Uhud.

Sad did not say a word. This was all part of the great process of self-criticism and rectification which helped to make Islam spread and establish it on foundations of justice and piety.

Muhammad ibn Maslamah served Umar’s successor, Uthman ibn Affan, faithfully. When, however, the latter was killed and civil war broke out among the Muslims, Muhammad ibn Maslamah did not participate. The sword which he always used and which was given to him by the Prophet(S.A.W) himself he deliberately broke. During the time of the Prophet, he was known as the “Knight of the Prophet”. By refusing to use the sword against Muslims he preserved this reputation undiminished.

Subsequently, he made a sword from wood and fashioned it well. He placed it in a scabbard and hung it inside his house. When he was asked about it he said: “I simply hang it there to terrify people.” Muhammad ibn Maslamah died in Madinah in the month of Safar in the year 46 AH. He was seventy seven years old.

From: Companions of the Prophet

Khabbab Ibn Al-Aratt

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Khabbab Ibn Al-Aratt

Stories Of The Salaf

A woman named Umm Anmaar who belonged to the Khuza’a tribe in Makkah went to the slave market in the city. She wanted to buy herself a youth for her domestic chores and to exploit his labour for economic gains. As she scrutinized the faces of those who were displayed for sale, her eyes fell on a boy who was obviously not yet in his teens. She saw that he was strong and healthy and that there were clear signs of intelligence on his face. She needed no further incentive to purchase him. She paid and walked away with her new acquisition.

On the way home, Umm Anmaar turned to the boy and said: “What’s your name, boy?”

“Khabbab.”

“And what’s your father’s name?”

“Al-Aratt.”

“Where do you come from?”

“From Najd.”

“Then you are an Arab!”

“Yes, from the Banu Tamim.”

“How then did you come into the hands of the slave dealers in Makkah?”

“One of the Arab tribes raided our territory. They took our cattle and captured women and children. I was among the youths captured. I passed from one hand to another until I ended up in Makkah . . .”

Umm Anmaar placed the youth as an apprentice to one of the blacksmiths in Makkah to learn the art of making swords. The youth learnt quickly and was soon an expert at the profession. When he was strong enough, Umm Anmaar set up a workshop for him with all the necessary tools and equipment for making swords. Before long he was quite famous in Makkah for his excellent craftsmanship. People also liked dealing with him because of his honesty and integrity. Umm Anmaar gained much profit through him and exploited his talents to the full.

In spite of his youthfulness, Khabbab displayed munique intelligence and wisdom. Often, when he had finished work and was left to himself, he would reflect deeply on the state of Arabian society which was so steeped in corruption. He was appalled at the aimless wandering, the ignorance and the tyranny which he saw. He was one of the victims of this tyranny and he would say to himself:

“After this night of darkness, there must be a dawn.” And he hoped that he would live long enough to see the darkness dissipate with the steady glow and brightness of new light.

Khabbab did not have to wait long. He was privileged to be in Makkah when the first rays of the light of Islam penetrated the city. It emanated from the lips of Muhammad ibn Abdullah as he announced that none deserves to be worshipped or adored except the Creator and Sustainer of the universe.

He called for an end to injustice and oppression and sharply criticised the practices of the rich in accumulating wealth at the expense of the poor and the outcast. He denounced aristocratic privileges and attitudes and called for a new order based on respect for human dignity and compassion for the underprivileged including orphans, wayfarers and the needy.

To Khabbab, the teachings of Muhammad(S.A.W) were like a powerful light dispelling the darkness of ignorance. He went and listened to these teachings directly from him. Without any hesitation he stretched out his hand to the Prophet in allegiance and testified that “There is no god but Allah and Muhammad is His servant and His messenger.” He was among the first ten persons to accept Islam.

Khabbab did not hide his acceptance of Islam from anyone. When the news of his becoming a Muslim reached Umm Anmaar, she became incensed with anger. She went to her brother Siba’a ibn Abd al-Uzza who gathered a gang of youths from the Khuza’a tribe and together they made their way to Khabbab. They found him completely engrossed in his work. Siba’a went up to him and said:

“We have heard some news from you which we don’t believe.” “What is it?” asked Khabbab.

“We have been told that you have given up your religion and that you now follow that man from the Banu Hashim .”

“I have not given up my religion,” replied Khabbab calmly. “I only believe in One God Who has no partner. I reject your idols and I believe that Muhammad(S.A.W) is the servant of God and His messenger.”

No sooner had Khabbab spoken these words than Siba’a and his gang set upon him. They beat him with their fists and with iron bars and they kicked him until he fell unconscious to the ground, with blood streaming from the wounds he received.

The news of what happened between Khabbab and his slave mistress spread throughout Makkah like wild-fire. People were astonished at Khabbab’s daring. They had not yet heard of anyone who followed Muhammad and who had had the audacity to announce the fact with such frankness and defiant confidence.

The Khabbab affair shook the leaders of the Quraysh. They did not expect that a blacksmith, such as belonged to Umm Anmaar and who had no clan in Makkah to protect him and no asabEyyah to prevent him from injury, would be bold enough to go outside her authority, denounce her gods and reject the religion of her forefathers.

They realized that this was only the beginning . . .

The Quraysh were not wrong in their expectations. Khabbab’s courage impressed many of his friends and encouraged them to announce their acceptance of Islam. One after another, they began to proclaim publicly the message of truth.

In the precincts of the Haram, near the Ka’bah, the Quraysh leaders gathered to discuss the problem of Muhammad(S.A.W). Among them were Abu Sufyan ibn Harb, al- Walid ibn al-Mughira and Abu Jahl ibn Hisham. They noted that Muhammad was getting stronger and that his following was increasing day by day, indeed hour by hour. To them this was like a terrible disease and they made up their minds to stop it before it got out of control. They decided that each tribe should get hold of any follower of Muhammad among them and punish him until he either recants his faith or dies.

On Siba’a ibn Abd al-Uzza and his people fell the task of punishing Khabbab even further. Regularly they began taking him to an open area in the city when the sun was at its zenith and the ground was scorching hot. They would take off his clothes and dress him in iron armour and lay him on the ground. In the intense heat his skin would be seared and his body would become inert. When it appeared that all strength had left him, they would come up and challenge him:

“What do you say about Muhammad?”

“He is the servant of God and His messenger. He has come with the religion of guidance and truth, to lead us from darkness into light.”

They would become more furious and intensify their beating. They would ask about al-Laat and al-Uzza and he would reply firmly:

“Two idols, deaf and dumb, that cannot cause harm or bring any benefit…”

This enraged them even more and they would take a big hot stone and place it on his back. Khabbab’s pain and anguish would be excruciating but he did not recant.

The inhumanity of Umm Anmaar towards Khabbab was not less than that of her brother. Once she saw the Prophet(S.A.W) speaking to Khabbab at his workshop and she flew into a blind rage. Every day after that, for several days, she went to Khabbab’s workshop and punished him by placing a red hot iron from the furnace on his head. The agony was unbearable and he often fainted.

Khabbab suffered long and his only recourse was to prayer. He prayed for the punishment of Umm Anmaar and her brother. His release from pain and suffering only came when the Prophet, peace be upon him, gave permission to his companions to emigrate to Madinah.

Umm Anmaar by then could not prevent him from going. She herself became afflicted with a tertible illness which no one had heard of before. She behaved as if she had suffered a rabid attack. The headaches she had were especially nerve- racking. Her children sought everywhere for medical help until finally they were told that the only cure was to cauterize her head. This was done. The treatment, with a ret hot iron, was more terrible than all the headaches she suffered.

At Madinah, among the generous and hospitable Ansar, Khabbab experienced a state of ease and restfulness which he had not known for a long time. He was delighted to be near the Prophet, peace be upon him, with no one to molest him or disturb his happiness.

He fought alongside the noble Prophet(S.A.W) at the battle of Badr. He participated in the battle of Uhud where he had the satisfaction of seeing Siba’a ibn Abd al-Uzza meet his end at the hands of Hamza ibn Abd al- Muttalib, the uncle of the Prophet(S.A.W).

Khabbab lived long enough to witness the great expansion of Islam under the four Khulafaa ar- Rashidun Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman and Ali. He once visited Umar during his caliphate. Umar stood up he was in a meeting and greeted Khabbab with the words:

“No one is more deserving than you to be in this assembly other than Bilal.”

He asked Khabbab about the torture and the persecution he had received at the hands of the mushrikeen. Khabbab described this in some detail since it was still very vivid in his mind. He then exposed his back and even Umar was aghast at what he saw.

In the last phase of his life, Khabbab was blessed with wealth such as he had never before dreamed of. He was, however, well-known for his generosity. It is even said that he placed his dirhams and his dinars in a part of his house that was known to the poor and the needy. He did not secure this money in any way and those in need would come and take what they needed without seeking any permission or asking any questions.

In spite of this, he was always afraid of his accountability to God for the way he disposed of this wealth. A group of companions related that they visited Khabbab when he was sick and he said:

“In this place there are eighty thousand dirhams. By God, I have never secured it any way and I have not barred anyone in need from it.”

He wept and they asked why he was weeping.

“I weep,” he said, “because my companions have passed away and they did not obtain any such reward in this world. I have lived on and have acquired this wealth and I fear that this will be the only reward for my deeds.”

Soon after he passed away. The Khalifah Ali ibn abi Talib, may God be pleased with him, stood at his grave and said:

“May God have mercy on Khabbab. He accepted Islam wholeheartedly. He performed hijrah willingly. He lived as a mujahid and God shall not withhold the reward of one who has done good.”

From “Companions of The Prophet”, Vol. 1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.